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Retirement can be an endless golf game or constant trips to the doctor, depending on a whole host of factors, including luck. But either way, it's a stage of life that's usually more difficult and expensive than people expect.

Tell Me More's series on end-of-life issues continues today, with a roundtable discussion at a retirement home in Washington, D.C.

Planet Money has obtained a secret government report outlining what once looked like a potential crisis: The possibility that the U.S. government might pay off its entire debt.

It sounds ridiculous today. But not so long ago, the prospect of a debt-free U.S. was seen as a real possibility with the potential to upset the global financial system.

We recently obtained the report through a Freedom of Information Act Request. You can read the whole thing here. (It's a PDF.)

As news of the killing of Col. Moammar Gadhafi spread, politicians, world leaders and dignitaries have been issuing statements. We've collected some them on this post and we'll add more as we get them:

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said this in a statement at U.N. headquarters in New York:

The Labor Department said today that claims of unemployment insurance dipped by 6,000 to 403,000. That brings the monthly average to to its lowest point in six months.

But careful, says The Wall Street Journal, the number still remains above 400,000, "indicating the labor market still is weak."

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RENEE MONTAGNE: 40:01">

A year after cholera burst upon earthquake-weary Haiti, plans are afoot to begin vaccinating people against the highly contagious disease.

Nearly half a million Haitians — about 5 percent of the population — have already been afflicted and more than 6,500 have died.

But the goal of the vaccinators isn't to stop cholera in its tracks. They can't do that in Haiti with just 200,000 doses — enough for only 100,000 people — that's all the manufacturer can offer.

Moammar Gadhafi ruled Libya with an iron fist for more than four decades. He was an unpredictable, often brutal leader with a grand vision of himself. In the end, he squandered his country's wealth and lost the support of his people.

During his 42 years of rule, Gadhafi reinvented his image many times — from revolutionary to Arab nationalist, freedom fighter and self-styled leader of Africa.

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The Historic Allure Of A Late Night Oyster

Oct 20, 2011

Despite its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay, Washington, D.C. isn't a seafood town in its own right, with a proper port. But just steps away from the White House, in the most straight-laced section of a straight-laced town, is a kind of temple to the most sensual of seafood – the raw oyster.

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This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

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And I'm Renee Montagne.

Look Around: 1 In 10 Americans Takes Antidepressants

Oct 20, 2011

We really are Prozac Nation now.

About 11 percent of people in the U.S. are taking antidepressants according to fresh figures out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Good morning.

We'll have to make this roundup short and sweet so that we can get back to following the day's hottest breaking news:

-- Reports: Gadhafi Stronghold Has Fallen; His Status Uncertain.

Our other headlines so far today:

-- In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says.

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro about multiple reports of the possible capture of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The end has come for Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who ruled Libya for more than 40 years and over the decades became one of the world's most notorious dictators and sponsors of terrorism.

After a harrowing night and day spent hunting escaped bears, lions, tigers and other dangerous animals, authorities in Muskingum County, Ohio, believe they have killed, captured or otherwise accounted for 56 animals that were freed Tuesday from a private reserve by a man who it's believed then killed himself.

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