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Africa
10:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Developments In Libya: Sirte Defeated; Gadhafi Dead?

Reports streamed in Thursday morning that Libya's Moammar Gadhafi had been captured and killed. A Libyan transitional government official told CNN that Gadhafi is dead. A NATO official cautioned that it will take time to confirm the reports. NPR foreign editor Loren Jenkins talks with Renee Montagne about the latest developments.

Shots - Health Blog
9:47 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Look Around: 1 In 10 Americans Takes Antidepressants

Prozac, the pill that launched the modern antidepressant era, and drugs like it are now taken by 11 percent of Americans.

Stephen Chernin Getty Images

We really are Prozac Nation now.

About 11 percent of people in the U.S. are taking antidepressants according to fresh figures out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Top Stories: Gadhafi's Fate; Animals In Ohio; World Series

Good morning.

We'll have to make this roundup short and sweet so that we can get back to following the day's hottest breaking news:

-- Reports: Gadhafi Stronghold Has Fallen; His Status Uncertain.

Our other headlines so far today:

-- In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says.

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Africa
8:29 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Reports: Libya's Ghadafi And His Hometown Captured

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro about multiple reports of the possible capture of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The Two-Way
7:34 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi Is Dead, Tripoli Rejoices

Anti-Gaddafi fighters celebrate the fall of Sirte in the town October 20, 2011.

Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:19 am

The end has come for Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who ruled Libya for more than 40 years and over the decades became one of the world's most notorious dictators and sponsors of terrorism.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Thu October 20, 2011

In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says

After a harrowing night and day spent hunting escaped bears, lions, tigers and other dangerous animals, authorities in Muskingum County, Ohio, believe they have killed, captured or otherwise accounted for 56 animals that were freed Tuesday from a private reserve by a man who it's believed then killed himself.

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Around the Nation
6:02 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Occupy Wall Street: From A Blog Post To A Movement

The Occupy Wall Street protests have inspired similar events around America, and in dozens of countries. Here, a truck has been painted with a sign supporting the Occupy Portland protests in Oregon.

Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:26 am

After more than 30 days, the Occupy Wall Street movement has evolved from a protest in New York City into a growing international movement. And it all started in July, as a single blog post inspired by the Arab Spring.

Here's a look at significant developments in the Occupy Wall Street timeline, as the movement gathered momentum and spread to other U.S. cities.

Timeline: Tracking Occupy Wall Street's Growth

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Economy
12:01 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Frustration Over Jobs Unites 'Occupiers' In Boston

Occupy Boston protesters congregate across the street from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Chris Arnold NPR

The U.S. hasn't had unemployment this high for this long since the Great Depression. That's weighing heavily on a lot of Americans and seems to be a key part of the frustration and anger that's being directed at Wall Street and the big banks. For many people, it's not so much about high finance as it is about a weekly paycheck.

"I'm unemployed, and I'm down here because I'm unemployed," says Bob Norkus, a protester in downtown Boston.

Walking around, it doesn't take long to figure out that many people here have the same problem.

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Economy
11:17 am
Wed October 19, 2011

The 'Informal Economy' Driving World Business

Robert Neuwirth is an investigative journalist. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, Newsday and The Nation.

Courtesy of the author

More than half of all employed people worldwide work off the books. And that number is expected to climb over the next decade.

"Estimates are that the informal economy around the world is [worth] about $10 trillion a year," says journalist Robert Neuwirth. "That's an astounding figure because what it means, basically, is that if the informal economy was combined in one country, it would be the second-largest economy on Earth, rivaling the United States economy."

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National Security
9:14 am
Wed October 19, 2011

In The Rush To Deport, Expelling U.S. Citizens

The government is not shy about its success deporting people from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) recently sent out videos of early-morning raids conducted across the country. Uniformed ICE agents are shown planning to capture suspects, followed by shots of the suspects being handcuffed and put into vehicles.

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Around the Nation
5:08 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

A Business Incubator Gives Funding And Jobs To Vets

Illumatek makes windshields that are engraved and lit with fiber optics so motorcycles are more visible on the road. Its founder worked with VETransfer, a nonprofit that connects veteran entrepreneurs with funding and business skills.

Courtesy of John Miller

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 5:08 am

As the U.S. winds down military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and troops come home, many are eager to start work in the civilian sector. But it's been tough: The federal government reports the unemployment rate for young veterans has hovered around 30 percent this year.

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Three Books...
9:51 am
Tue September 6, 2011

What's In Store: 3 Tales Of A Terrifying Future

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon January 2, 2012 9:53 pm

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

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Music Reviews
1:41 pm
Mon August 29, 2011

Wilhelm Furtwaengler: A Complex German Conductor

German conductor and composer Wilhelm Furtwaengler.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 7:59 am

Note: Wilhelm Furtwangler's last name is typically spelled with an umlaut over the 'a' character. The npr website does not support characters with umlauts over characters. A variation of Furtwangler's name without the umlaut is spelled Furtwaengler.

Wilhelm Furtwaengler's name may be hard for Americans to pronounce, but the reason this great conductor isn't so well-remembered here is that he chose to remain in Germany during WWII, though he was never a member of the Nazi Party, and was exonerated by a postwar tribunal.

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