From NPR News

Pages

Middle East
5:52 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Libyans Say NATO's Bomb Sometimes Hit Civilians

On an Aug. 10 tour organized by Moammar Gadhafi's governement, an unidentified man lies in a hospital bed in Tripoli. He was allegedly injured during NATO airstrikes a day earlier.

Dario Lopez-Mills AP

NATO's role in Libya was crucial to the rebellion that toppled Moammar Gadhafi, but that assistance came at a cost, according to some Libyans.

Mohammed Abueishi lives in the Souq al-Juma neighborhood of Tripoli, near an apartment building on a quiet residential street that was hit by a NATO airstrike a little after 1 a.m. on June 19.

"I was sleeping and suddenly there was an enormous blast and all the doors and the windows burst open. There was a huge amount of dust in the house," he said. "I stumbled out to find my uncle's house destroyed."

Read more
The Salt
5:37 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Customer Outrage Forces Necco To Put Artificial Ingredients Back Into Wafers

When the people who make Necco Wafers changed their recipe to use natural flavors and colors in 2009, they thought they were doing their customers a favor. But then those customers told the New England Confectionery Company — loudly, and repeatedly — that they preferred artificially enhanced candy.

"Our normal mail volume probably went up twenty-fold" after the change, says Necco Vice President of Research and Quality Jeff Green says. "Some positive, and some negative. But a lot of negative."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

As Arab League Delegation Meets With Assad, Crackdowns Continue In Syria

Tens of thousands of people rally in support of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus on Wednesday.

Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 5:07 pm

A delegation from the Arab League met with President Bashar Assad, today. The visit is supposed to facilitate the ceasefire demanded by the Arab nations in a resolution last week.

Read more
Latin America
4:34 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Drug Violence Swamps A Once Peaceful Mexican City

"Los Mata Zetas," or the "Zeta Killers," described themselves in a recent video as a paramilitary group that will go after members of the Zeta drug cartel. The Mexican government, however, has described it as a rival drug cartel that is just seeking to eliminate competition from the Zetas.

AFP AFP/Getty Images

In the latest twist to Mexico's drug wars, a new group has vowed to launch a paramilitary offensive against a leading drug cartel in Veracruz, a city that has become a flash point in the violence.

Over the past month, more than 100 bodies have been strewn around the city, which is one of Mexico's largest and oldest ports. The violence prompted Mexican President Felipe Calderon to declare that Veracruz has been "left in the hands of the Zetas," one of the most brutal criminal organizations in the country.

Read more
Science
4:27 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Used Lab Equipment Finds A Second Home Overseas

Amanda Nottke, who earned her Ph.D. from Harvard, sorts through used micropipettes that will be shipped to overseas science labs.

Ari Daniel Shapiro for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:35 pm

Science is an expensive endeavor. Labs in the U.S. can easily spend millions of dollars each year on equipment, chemicals and supplies alone. But for scientists in the developing world, these costs are often prohibitive. That's where a clever idea has made all the difference.

In a Harvard Medical School corridor on a rainy Saturday afternoon, a handful of graduate students are emptying boxes of scientific equipment into the hallway to take inventory: microcentrifuge tubes, radiation counters, micropipetters, Erlenmeyer flasks.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Cool Photo: Lighting Fireworks For Diwali

Indian children light fireworks in New Delhi for Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights. The festival marks the victory of good over evil and commemorates the time when Hindu God Lord Rama achieved victory over Ravana and returned to his kingdom Ayodhya after 14 years in exile.

Sajjad Hussain AFP/Getty Images

Today Hindus across the world are celebrating Diwali, or the festival of lights. There's plenty of coverage about the celebrations, and the Hindustan Times has a good overview.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:19 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Are Crackdowns A Turning Point For Occupy Protests?

Occupy Oakland protesters carry away a man who was hit by a police tear gas canister Tuesday near the Oakland City Hall.

AFP/Getty Images

Police crackdowns in Atlanta and Oakland, Calif., to disperse protests affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement could mark a turning point in the tactics of both the demonstrators and the authorities dealing with them, experts say.

Oakland police equipped with riot gear fired tear gas and, according to demonstrators, used rubber bullets and flash grenades on Tuesday to clear Frank Ogawa Park in front of City Hall. In Atlanta, helicopters circled over a small city park just after midnight Wednesday as officers moved in to arrest about 50 protesters.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Trial Of American Alleged To Have Supported Al-Qaida Getting Started

Tarek Mahenna.

Facebook.com

Opening statements are set to begin Thursday in Boston at the trial of Tarek Mehanna, a 29-year-old American charged in U.S. District Court with conspiracy and providing material support to al-Qaida, as well as planning to attend training camps abroad and making false statements to authorities. He faces a possible life sentence if convicted.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Report: Obama In Line With Predecessors On Pace Of Regulation

Bloomberg dug through quite a bit of government data to answer a question that's been talked about quite a bit over the past few months: Has President Obama ushered in an era of costly business regulation? Republicans have made the claim regularly. Former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney, a Republican presidential candidate, said, "President Obama has vastly expanded the regulatory reach of government."

Read more
The Salt
3:35 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Insect Cuisine Is All The Buzz

A customer holds up a spoon of deep-fried water bug in a restaurant in Thailand. Insects are a popular food in Thailand and many other countries around the world.

Sakchai Lalit ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 4:46 pm

Kudos to the SF Weekly for their fascinating in-depth cover story last week on bug eating. The City by the Bay has become a "hotbed of insect cuisine," David Gordon, an entomophagist (bug eater) and author of The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook, tells the alternative weekly.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:34 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Looking For Lung Cancer With A Yearly X-Ray Doesn't Reduce Deaths

A chest X-ray of a cigarette smoker's lungs.

American Cancer Society Getty Images

The drive to test healthy people for common cancers rests on the idea that finding malignancies early can trigger life-saving treatment. But the evidence that some of the tests will actually reduce mortality is sometimes lacking or is less than clear cut for the people who'll get tested.

Read more
Politics
2:17 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Pressure Is On For House GOP Freshman To Fundraise

House Republican freshman, some of whom shown here in April, are learning that fundraising is a big part of the job.

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Last month, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee raised almost double what its Republican counterpart took in despite that the GOP holds the majority in the House. One group of Republicans that seems to be having a tough go of it is that huge class of freshman Republicans who took 2010 by storm.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Calling For President's Ouster, Yemeni Women Burn Their Veils

Amid a relentless and bloody crackdown on protesters by Yemen's government, hundreds of women took to the streets today and set fire to veils traditionally worn by them. As the AP reports, this was not a protest about women's rights, instead "the act of women burning their clothing is a symbolic Bedouin tribal gesture signifying an appeal for help to tribesmen, in this case to stop the attacks on the protesters."

Read more
The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Photo: Season's First Big Snow Hits Denver

Here's a picture that will remind the rest of the country that winter will soon be upon us:

That picture was taken this morning and posted to Flickr by Pam Morris in Denver, Colo. As she says, the season's first snow is about a week late. The Weather Channel says some parts of Colorado could see up to eight inches of snow and it follows days of record heat.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

World Series: Decision Coming On Whether To Play Tonight

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 4:15 pm

Update at 3:35 p.m. ET: MLB.com has posted the news that Game 6 of the World Series, which was scheduled for tonight in St. Louis, has been postponed to Thursday at 8:05 p.m. ET because of rainy weather.

That means Game 7, if one is needed, would be played on Friday (weather permitting).

The American League's Texas Rangers lead the National League's St. Louis Cardinals, 3 games to 2.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

787 Dreamliner Completes First Commercial Flight

A Boeing 787 Dreamliner arrives at Tokyo's Haneda airport as fire engines spray it with water during a test flight.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner completed its first commercial flight today. The All Nipon Airways flight flew from Narita to Hong Kong and took about four hours.

As we've reported, the road to this day has been long and full of troubles. The plane is making its debut years delayed and billions of dollars over budget.

Read more
NPR News Investigations
12:32 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Tribes Question Foster Group's Power And Influence

Children at the Black Hills campus of the Children's Home Society head into the main building for lunch. The home caters to children with special needs, many of whom are Native American.

Laura Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 2:46 pm

Part two of a three-part investigation

On a small crest deep in South Dakota's Black Hills, a dozen children jumped on sleds and floated across the snow. They are wards of the state, and this is their home: the western campus of the Children's Home Society.

There are rolling hills, a babbling brook — even a new school.

Children's Home Director Bill Colson says it's a place to help children who can't make it in regular foster homes.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Report: College Costs Continue Rising, Aid Cuts Could Add To Pain

Students and parents won't be surprised to hear that the prices colleges and universities officially charge for tuition, room and board went up yet again this academic year.

The College Board reported Tuesday that:

-- "Published in-state tuition and fees at public four-year institutions average $8,244 in 2011-12, $631 (8.3 percent) higher than in 2010-11."

Read more
Monkey See
12:04 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

'Shame,' Sex And Violence: Can We Reclaim The NC-17 Rating?

Actor Michael Fassbender attends the 'Shame' premiere during the 55th BFI London Film Festival on October 14, 2011 in London, England.

Gareth Cattermole Getty Images for the BFI

Certain facts regarding movie ratings are not in dispute.

Read more
Planet Money
12:00 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Why Has Income Gone Up So Much For The Top One Percent?

CBO

Income rose across the board for U.S. households over the past 30 years, according to a new report from the CBO. But it went through the roof for the households in the top one percent of the income distribution.

Read more
All Tech Considered
11:39 am
Wed October 26, 2011

With The Flick Of A Switch, It's Crystal Clear To Hear

Arielle Schacter, 17, holds her hearing aid in a New York subway station. Hearing loop technology funnels a transit worker's voice into her ear, blocking out the subway noise behind her.
Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 2:06 am

For the more than 10 percent of Americans who have some form of hearing loss, mass transit can be frustrating, especially on a busy travel weekend like this one. Even if you wear a hearing aid, trying to hear in places like airports, theaters and places of worship can be tough.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:19 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Community Board Backs 'Occupy' Protesters; Asks Them To Quiet Down

The local community board for the part of Manhattan where the Occupy Wall Street protests are being held voted Tuesday night to bless the occupation "within certain parameters," The Village Voice reports.

Read more
The Salt
11:09 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Men Can Be Binge-Eaters, Too

Male binge eaters were more likely to be depressed and obese than men who didn't binge, a study found.

Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 12:20 pm

When we think of eating disorders, the classic image is a waif-thin, anorexic woman.

But here's a question for men: Do you find yourself fasting after eating too much? Or maybe pushing through an insanely long run or workout, trying to compensate for overeating through intense exercise?

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
10:58 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Supporters Of Health Overhaul Look To Reclaim 'Obamacare'

President Barack Obama greets people outside the Old Market Deli in Cannon Falls, Minn., on the Aug. 15, during a Midwest bus tour. The same day he said he likes the term "Obamacare."

Samantha Appleton The White House

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 12:33 pm

"Thanks Obamacare." Sounds like sarcasm, right?

Sure, opponents of the federal law overhauling health care tagged it with the "Obamacare" moniker to belittle the measure even before it had passed.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:32 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Sales Of New Homes Rose In September As Builders Cut Prices

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 10:35 am

There was a 5.7 percent increase in sales of new homes in September from August, the Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development report.

The 313,000 (at an annual rate) pace was still down 0.9 percent, however, from a year earlier.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:20 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Alcohol Killed Amy Winehouse, Coroner Rules

Amy Winehouse in 2007.

Matt Dunham AP

There were no illegal drugs in singer Amy Winehouse's system when she died on July 23, a British coroner reported today.

Instead, the troubled 27-year-old suffered "death by misadventure" — a drinking binge.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:50 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Army Ranger On 14th Deployment Killed In Afghanistan

Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij.

U.S. Army Special Operations Command

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 9:58 am

This young man's death says a lot about how much has been asked of the nation's men and women in uniform and their families since Sept. 11, 2001:

Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, was killed on Saturday in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, by an improvised explosive device, according to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command.

"He was on his 14th combat deployment to Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror," the statement adds.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:57 am
Wed October 26, 2011

New Insider Trading Case Reaches Into 'Iconic Corporate America'

The news this morning that "a prominent former Goldman Sachs board member" has surrendered to federal authorities in New York City "to face criminal charges stemming from a massive hedge fund insider trading case" (as the AP writes), takes the federal investigation into new territory, New York Times reporter Azam Ahmed said earlier today on Morning Edition.

Read more
World
8:48 am
Wed October 26, 2011

3 People Pulled Out Of Turkish Quake Rubble Alive

A Turkish men searches through the debris of his collapsed building in Ercis.

Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 12:38 pm

Two teachers and a university student were rescued from ruined buildings in eastern Turkey on Wednesday, three days after a devastating earthquake, but searchers said hopes of finding anyone else alive were rapidly fading.

NTV television said 25-year-old teacher Seniye Erdem was pulled out around the same time that rescue workers also freed another teacher. The woman was thirsty and asked about her husband, who had died, it said

Read more

Pages