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National Security
7:21 am
Thu November 24, 2011

U.S. Easing Out Of Nation-Building Business

A U.S. Marine pushes a child on a swing in southern Afghanistan on March 4. After a decade of nation-building in Afghanistan, and nearly as long in Iraq, the U.S. appears to be losing it appetite for such efforts.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 5:12 pm

Nation-building has gone out of style.

The U.S. effort in Afghanistan has lasted a decade, and it's been nearly as long in Iraq. Now, there's little appetite in American political circles for large-scale attempts to build up the economies or political institutions of other countries.

Most U.S. troops will be pulled out of Iraq by the end of the year. And the Obama administration has been careful not to take on responsibility for rebuilding Libya after the NATO bombing campaign that helped drive Moammar Gadhafi from power.

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The Record
7:00 am
Thu November 24, 2011

On Commercial Radio, Christmas Is Coming Early

Christmas music superstar Bing Crosby performing in 1977, back when the season, at least on the radio, started after Thanksgiving.
Getty Images

If it seems like you're hearing more Christmas music on the radio these days, it's not your imagination. More stations have been going all-Christmas — and they're doing it earlier than ever.

The reason is simple: Christmas music makes ratings go through the roof.

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Politics
6:55 am
Thu November 24, 2011

David Frum Asks, 'When Did The GOP Lose Touch?'

Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 11:01 am

Republican David Frum, a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, is seriously upset with the state of his party. He's written an article in the current New York magazine, titled "When Did the GOP Lose Touch with Reality?"

As he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep, one of Frum's complaints is the idea that his fellow Republicans insist on having their own set of facts.

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Around the Nation
6:54 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Map: How Travelers, Expatriates And Service Members Spend Thanksgiving

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 10:52 am

Thanksgiving has all the makings of a uniquely American tradition: parades, football, pumpkin pie, roasted turkey. But for Americans living in other countries, observing the traditional way can be a challenge. We asked those who will be abroad this Thanksgiving how they'll be spending the holiday — and what changes they'll have to make to their celebrations. We received more than 1,200 responses from our Facebook followers. Some of the most common issues? Finding an inexpensive turkey or locating canned pumpkin. Here's a sample of what you said. Responses have been edited for space.

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NPR Story
6:16 am
Thu November 24, 2011

'Prince and The Show Girl'

In 1956, two icons — Marilyn Monroe and Sir Laurence Olivier — got together in London to make a movie, The Prince and the Showgirl. It was a comedy about the lonely Prince Regent of Carpathia, who meets a flirty American showgirl. The film was a royal flop. Now a new movie, My Week With Marilyn, recounts the miserable time had by all on the set. It's the story of one week during the film shoot, with behind-the-scenes clashes, misaligned acting styles, and the pursuit of personal ambitions. Michelle Williams plays Monroe and Kenneth Branagh plays Olivier.

NPR Story
5:54 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Bond Worries Reveal The Depths Of Europe's Crisis

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 11:01 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The cost of borrowing is the best way to gauge the severity of Europe's crisis. Here's Zoe Chace of NPR's Planet Money team.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: Andrew Balls has a front seat to the European debt crisis. That's because he's someone who lends money to European countries. He's at one of the biggest bond outfits in the world: PIMCO. He says, if you look back over the course of the year, there is one moment that stands out, a tipping point.

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NPR Story
5:30 am
Thu November 24, 2011

In Bahrain, Report Details Abuses During Uprising

The U.S. State Department says it's urging the government of the Persian Gulf kingdom of Bahrain to act on the findings of a major human rights report that has just been issued. That report details the abuses that took place during and after a mass uprising in Bahrain that was styled after movements in Tunisia and Egypt. The report was commissioned by the government itself and assembled by a team of international legal experts. But it remains to be seen whether it will lead to real reform and dialogue between the ruling Sunni monarchy and the Shiite majority.

Africa
5:30 am
Thu November 24, 2011

A Wary Truce Emerges In Egypt

In Egypt, intense clashes between protestors and security forces overnight raised the death toll from recent violence to at least 40. But both sides appear to be observing a truce this morning, with protestors who are pouring into the square limiting their actions to chants against Egypt's military rulers. Tens of thousands of Egyptians have been protesting since last Friday, demanding the ruling military council step aside.

Europe
6:32 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Spain's Next Leader Is Urged To Get An Early Start

In Spain, last weekend's election victory by austerity-minded conservatives hasn't done much to quell volatile markets. It's been a rude awakening for Spain's next prime minister, Mariano Rajoy, who's under pressure to enact reforms quickly — even before he takes office next month.

Around the Nation
6:24 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

TSA Nears A Goal: Letting You Keep Your Shoes On

Nearly 3.5 million holiday travelers are expected to board planes this Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Many dread the long lines and invasive procedures of security checkpoints. Hoping to improve the experience, the Transportation Security Administration is working on a device that would let passengers keep their shoes on through security checks.

Politics
6:13 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Huntsman Struggles For Traction In New Hampshire

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 11:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Most candidates see a strong showing in the New Hampshire primary as important. For Republican Jon Huntsman, it's essential. The former Utah governor has staked his whole campaign on the New Hampshire primary. New Hampshire Public Radio's Josh Rogers reports.

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The Two-Way
5:38 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Google Scraps Renewable Energy Initiative

With a small mention on its blog, Google officially scrapped a project, which sought to drive down the cost of renewable energy.

"At this point, other institutions are better positioned than Google to take this research to the next level. So we've published our results to help others in the field continue to advance the state of power tower technology, and we've closed our efforts," Google said on its official blog.

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Mitt Romney
5:20 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Romney To Iowans: 'The Country Counts On You'

Mitt Romney, shown with Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, speaks to Nationwide Insurance employees Wednesday in Des Moines, Iowa. Thune, once considered a potential candidate himself, has endorsed Romney in the GOP race for the presidential nomination.
Mark Kegans Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 8:13 am

Mitt Romney was campaigning in Iowa on Wednesday, raising his flag a bit higher in the state that begins the presidential nominating process with its caucuses on Jan. 3.

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

NFL's Thanksgiving Day Lineup: Grudge Matches, Not 'Turkeys'

With five of Thursday's six teams owning winning records, the NFL's 2011 Thanksgiving Day games are creating some anticipation. In Atlanta, a fan got into the holiday spirit last week, wearing a turkey/referee hat.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 11:01 am

With six weeks left in the NFL's regular season, the league's traditional Thanksgiving Day Classic games have football fans excited. Almost all of the teams involved are having strong seasons. And if the day's three games have a common theme, it could be "grudge match."

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Shots - Health Blog
5:01 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Scientists Bag Small Game In Bathroom Germ Safari

Right this way, ladies and germs.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 5:03 pm

Turns out Howard Hughes was right. The world is a very germy place, especially public restrooms.

The reclusive billionaire, who had the world's most notorious case of so-called germophobia, would go to just about any length to avoid contamination. He wore tissue boxes on his feet. He burned his clothing if someone near him got sick. He wrote careful instructions to his staff on how to open a can of peaches without contaminating them.

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Planet Money
4:28 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Brandi and Kaylee plan to open a truck repair shop when they graduate from high school.
Robert Smith NPR

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 6:12 pm

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

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Music Interviews
4:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 3:45 pm

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

VIDEO: Helicopter Crashes While Installing A Christmas Tree

Firefighters spray foam at the scene where a helicopter crashed while installing a large Christmas Tree at the Viaduct Harbour in Auckland, New Zealand.
Phil Walter Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 3:57 pm

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The Two-Way
3:25 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Bolo Ties: Not Just For Westerns

Actors Roy Rogers and Dale Evans are shown in this photo, as Roy sports a bolo tie honoring his horse, Trigger.
KEVORK DJANSEZIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 4:32 pm

An Arizona museum is giving that state's official neck wear a display all of its own for the next several months. The Heard Museum has opened its newest exhibit: Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary. It will run through next September.

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The Salt
3:05 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, on Nov. 20, 2011.
Emma Jacobs WRVO

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 6:12 pm

Most people think of turkeys as the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving meal. But at one farm, the turkeys are the guests.

At the 26th annual Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, a line of turkeys come walking out the door of the barn. They stroll towards long low tables set up on the lawn, with scarlet tablecloths and seasonal squash centerpieces.

There, a feast awaits. There's pumpkin pie topped with cranberry, and platters of green salad — hold the dressing. The spread is surrounded by a crowd of spectators.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:01 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Tavenner To Replace Berwick As Medicare Chief

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 5:41 pm

President Obama is nominating Marilyn Tavenner to succeed Dr. Donald M. Berwick as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Tavenner, who has been the agency's principal deputy administrator, will serve as administrator on an acting basis during the confirmation process, according to an announcement to CMS staff.

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Middle East
3:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Yemen's President Agrees To Relinquish Power

Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh has flown to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, where Yemeni officials signed an agreement to relinquish power to his vice president. The accord could mark the end of more than 11 months of crisis and violence that has left Yemen on the brink of civil war. Guy Raz talks to Tom Finn, who is covering the story for the Guardian newspaper.

Middle East
3:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Report: Bahrain Used Excessive Force On Protesters

Bahraini protesters run for cover after police fired tear gas canisters to disperse them during a demonstration in the village of Diraz, northwest of Bahrain, Feb. 14. A special commission issued a report Wednesday that found excessive force was used during a crackdown on an anti-government movement that began in February.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 6:32 pm

In the Persian Gulf kingdom of Bahrain, a special commission accused the government of using excessive force against protesters during an anti-government uprising earlier this year.

The report released Wednesday was unusual in that it was requested by the government itself. But questions remain over what the government will do with the findings.

The commission that issued the report was a rare thing in the Arab world. At a gilded palace with chandeliers and red carpets, a panel of international jurists sat in judgment of a king.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Report: Occupy Protests Have Cost Cities $13 Million

According to an AP survey of 18 cities with active Occupy protests, the movement has cost local municipalities $13 million in "police overtime and other municipal services."

The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
2:26 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

FBI Raid Nabs 7 Suspected In Amish Beard Attacks

Sam Mullet outside his home in Bergholz, Ohio, earlier this year.
Amy Sancetta AP

"The FBI and local sheriff's deputies this morning raided an Amish compound in Ohio and arrested seven men, including reputed breakaway sect leader Sam Mullet, on federal hate crimes charges and related state violations in connection to a series of beard-cutting attacks against other Amish across Ohio," the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writes.

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Politics
2:15 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Gingrich's Remarks On Immigration Surprises Many

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich answers a question at Tuesday's Republican presidential debate in Washington, D.C.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is getting lots of attention for his remarks about immigration in Wednesday night's debate. Gingrich has been moving up in the polls and last night he broke with his fellow candidates by saying that some illegal immigrants should be allowed to stay in the U.S. Though his statements were in line with other GOP candidates from years past, the aftershocks show just how narrow the immigration debate has been in recent years.

Gingrich spouted the typical Repubican line in last night's debate,

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It's All Politics
2:14 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Pro-Huntsman Ad Asks N.H. Voters: 'Why Haven't We Heard Of This Guy?'

A super PAC ad airing in New Hampshire over the Thanksgiving holiday promotes Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman as the "conservative ... who actually has a chance to win," but then poses the question: "Why haven't we heard of this guy?"

If you live in New Hampshire, the answer, arguably, is you haven't been paying attention.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:11 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

How To Avoid A Thanksgiving Trip To The ER

Watch yourself around the sharp implements this Thanksgiving.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 2:33 pm

Take it from emergency room doctors, Thanksgiving can be dangerous.

I learned the hard way that plumbers' busiest day comes on Black Friday, when pipes are groaning from too many flushes from Thanksgiving guests and too much garbage shoved down the kitchen sink.

How about hospitals? Yep, the emergency room can be a pretty busy place, too, according to the American College of Emergency Physicians.

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The Salt
2:08 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Heritage Turkeys: To Save Them, We Must Eat Them

Narragansett and Standard Bronze heritage breed turkeys browse at a farm in Westport, Mass.
Stephan Savoia AP

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 10:49 pm

A decade ago there were fewer than 100 Narragansett turkeys being raised on a few hobby farms. The gamy-tasting meat has a flavor that most Americans have never tasted. "They're delicious," says Slow Food USA's Josh Viertel.

"And they're at risk of being gone forever."

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Moody's Keeps United States' AAA Rating

Moody's Investors Service announced Wednesday that despite the supercommittee's inability to reach a debt-reducing deal, it would leave the United States' top-notch credit rating intact.

The Hill reports:

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