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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

McCain Says Report Backs Comments About Immigrants Causing Wildfires

Sen. John McCain says a new report from the Government Accountability Office backs some of the controversial comments the Republican from Arizona made over the summer.

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The Salt
5:07 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Revived Thanksgiving Tradition: Oyster Ice Cream

Serve this for T-Day, and you'll be in sync with history.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 11:00 am

Chef José Andrés grew up in Spain, but he has embraced Thanksgiving as a window into American history. That's why the guests at his Thanksgiving dinner might be starting off with oyster ice cream.

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The Salt
5:05 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Eating Canned Soup Makes BPA Levels Soar

The soup aisle at a grocery store in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

If you read the ingredient list on a can of soup, you're likely to see items like carrots, wild rice, perhaps some noodles. What you won't see listed: BPA.

But a little canned soup for lunch can dramatically increase exposure to the chemical, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study confirms that canned food is a source of BPA exposure. But it does nothing to clear up the question of whether this sort of exposure to BPA has health consequences.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Second Set Of 'Climategate' Emails Hit The Web

In a repeat of 2009, a second set of stolen emails from climate scientists at major universities has been released to the public.

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The Salt
4:54 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

When Thanksgiving Means Making Reservations, Not Turkey

Restaurants appeal to "activity-rich time-poor" Americans on Thanksgiving, the National Restaurant Association says.
STEPHAN ZABEL iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 5:52 pm

The moment of last-minute head counts and late-night runs to the supermarket has nearly arrived. But a small but proud segment of the population simply smiles and puts their feet up. They're having Thanksgiving dinner served to them in a restaurant.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:25 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Remember Vioxx? Merck Settles Marketing Charges From Way Back

Vioxx may be gone, but it wasn't forgotten by the Justice Department.
Daniel Hulshizer AP

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 11:44 am

Drugmaker Merck took the painkiller Vioxx off the market in 2004, citing an increased risk of heart attacks among people taking the medicine.

Today, seven years later, the Justice Department said Merck had agreed to pay $950 million to settle charges the company went too far in marketing the drug.

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Planet Money
4:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 11:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

'Darkhorse' Marine Remembered By His Uncle John

Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines.
David Gilkey NPR

When Talk of the Nation's Neal Conan asks for callers on a given topic, there's no telling what he'll get. Today, the show followed up with NPR's Tom Bowman on his series about the tremendous sacrifices of the "Darkhorse" Battalion — the Marines of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment. Lance Cpl. Jake Romo lost both his legs in Afghanistan with the battalion, and he spoke with Conan and Bowman about his tour.

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Around the Nation
3:21 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

'Going Postal' Blogger Memorializes Post Offices

Courtesy of Evan Kalish

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:14 am

The government is expected to shut down at least 3,000 post offices — and one hobbyist who visits post offices around the country has taken notice.

Evan Kalish collects hand-cancellation marks and blogs about it on Going Postal, where he posts photographs of each location.

Kalish, who's also a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania in geospatial analytics, started his hobby right out of college — and he has run up an impressive tally of how many he's visited: 2,745.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Scientists Discover First Night-Flowering Orchid

Bulbophyllum nocturnum, the only known night-flowering orchid
Andre Schuiteman Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

When scientists brought the Bulbophyllum nocturnum back to the Netherlands, they were perplexed. They had found the plant on the island of New Britain, near Papua New Guinea. They knew the plant came from a rare group, but the orchid's blooms would die before opening up. At least that's what the scientists thought.

The orchid's uniqueness never became clear until one scientist brought it home with him. Here's how MSNBC tells the story:

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Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates
3:15 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

In Gingrich's Past, A Lesson On Ambition

Newt Gingrich is shown teaching a class at West Georgia College (now known as the University of West Georgia) in the 1970s. As a politician, he has long stressed his background as a scholar.
Courtesy of Gingrich Productions

Last in a series

Newt Gingrich was in his 20s when he was hired at West Georgia College as a history professor. He had just returned from Belgium, where he was doing research for his doctoral dissertation.

"He was very much a person of intellect," says Mel Steeley, who taught history at the college for four decades and helped bring Gingrich to the school in 1970. "He would wander across campus and didn't notice people. He'd have something in his mind, always be thinking about something. When he first came, you kind of wondered if he was a student or a professor."

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Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Parenting Advice For The 20-Something Years

Brian Griffith (left), shown here in 2009 at age 26, moved home with his parents, Jay and Jennifer Griffith, after losing his job. The tight job market, especially for college grads, has prompted many young adults to move back in with their parents.
Robert Lahser MCT /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 5:53 pm

From pregnancy on, parents often keep a stack of bedside reading full of advice on raising children — survival tips from the terrible toddler years through annoying adolescence. Los Angeles comedy writer Gail Parent figured she'd be done with all that once her kids turned the magical age of 21.

"Because I didn't tell my parents anything bad or negative," she says. "I let them be very peaceful about me when I was an adult. But I had told my kids to tell me everything when they were young."

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Obama Gets Heckled, Occupy-Style

A protester shouts during a speech by President Obama today in Manchester, N.H.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Here's what it sounds like when protesters use the Occupy Wall Street "human microphone" technique to heckle the commander in chief.

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Politics
2:47 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Postmaster: Postal Service In Dire Financial Straits

U.S. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said Monday that the Postal Service is in "a deep financial crisis" because it has a "business model that is tied to the past."
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 2:07 pm

U.S. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe appealed to Congress on Monday to help him reform the Postal Service.

"We're in a deep financial crisis today because we have a business model that is tied to the past. We are expected to operate like a business, but do not have the flexibility to do so," he said at the National Press Club.

Donahoe also rejected the postal reform bills that have passed committees of the Republican-controlled House and the Democratic Senate.

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The Two-Way
2:26 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Too Sweet A Deal? British Cupcake-Maker Says She Was Burned By Groupon

Sites like LivingSocial and Groupon offer big discounts at a variety of retailers, like cupcake bakeries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 2:31 pm

Sometimes, there is such a thing as too sweet a deal. A British cupcake-maker decided to offer a Groupon deal that she says wiped out any profits she had made all year. If you're not familiar, Groupon is an Internet coupon company in which businesses offer deals to lure new customers into their shops.

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Living Large: Obesity In America
1:58 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

School Transforms Teens' Lives, One Pound At A Time

Wellspring students do high steps on the tennis court. Exercise is paramount at Wellspring, and a little rain doesn't get in the way of outdoor activities.
Travis Dove for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 7:04 pm

First of two stories, which are part of an ongoing series on obesity in America. The first part begins in August as students start their weight-loss journey at Wellspring Academy, a boarding school in Brevard, N.C. The second checks in with the students a few months later.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:51 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

When Weighing Painkillers, Americans Worry: 'Will I Become An Addict?'

Narcotic painkillers are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., with more than 244 million prescriptions dispensed in 2010.

The drugs help ease the pain of tens of millions of people each year. But the potent narcotics also carry serious risks that can be heightened by chronic use or abuse.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Seven More Years In Prison For Blagojevich Adviser Tony Rezko

Antoin "Tony" Rezko, who was an adviser and fundraiser for convicted former Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D) and also raised money for then-state Sen. Barack Obama before Obama's election to the U.S. Senate in 2004, was sentenced today to serve seven more years in prison.

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Around the Nation
1:22 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Asking For Quiet: How To Defuse Thanksgiving Spats

When families get together for Thanksgiving, spirited discussions can sometimes break out at the table.
Vanda Grigorovic iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 7:00 am

The Thanksgiving holiday offers a chance to connect with family and enjoy a relaxing meal. But it doesn't always happen that way — especially when political arguments break out at the table. We asked our audience to share their stories on NPR's Facebook page, and the responses came rolling in.

Stef Work echoed the sentiment of many, saying, "I don't think I am alone when I find the visits too long and the social graces too few."

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The Picture Show
1:14 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Photographer Captures Plight Of The Tiger

Dara Arista, 8, holds a photo of Sheila in front of the tiger's cage at the zoo in Jambi, Indonesia. Poachers had slaughtered Sheila during the night.
Steve Winter National Geographic

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:14 am

Showcasing the perils that tigers face today was a challenging assignment for National Geographic photographer Steve Winter — but not for the reason you might think.

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The Two-Way
1:08 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Ala. Immigration Law Back In Spotlight After Mercedes-Benz Exec Is Arrested

Foliage is seen on the engine hood of a Mercedes Benz.
Joerg Sarbach ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 1:37 pm

Last week, a Mercedes-Benz executive was stopped by police in Alabama because his rental car did not have a license plate. He had a German identification card but had left his passport and driver's license at his hotel.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

A Case For Cash Donations, Instead Of Cans

Every November, food donation boxes in offices, stores and schools fill with shelf-stable food. But as much as half of it may never be used, says Katherina Rosqueta of the University of Pennsylvania's Center For High Impact Philanthropy. She says it's time to can food drives and donate cash instead.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The 'Darkhorse' Battalion And Wartime Sacrifice

The Marines of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment, known as the "Darkhorse" Battalion, have suffered the worst casualty rate of any Marine unit in the Afghan war. During a seven-month tour, they lost 25 men; nearly 200 were wounded. Still, the Marines in the unit agree it was worth it.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Confidential Informers Play Complex Role For FBI

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 2:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This past weekend, New York City officials charged a man they called a lone wolf a would-be terrorist arrested in the act of manufacturing three pipe bombs. But today we read reports that the FBI declined to pursue a case against Jose Pimentel because it had questions about the role of a confidential informer. More from NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston in just a moment. But we also want to hear from those of you who work in law enforcement.

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From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Letters: Lost In Translation And Holiday Travel

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics, including an example of how meaning gets lost in translation, the challenges of raising a terminally ill child, and advice on how to travel with kids this Thanksgiving.

Mental Health
1:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

ADHD Sufferers Fear An Adderall Shortage

Up to 15 million children and adults are thought to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Many of them take Adderall to treat it. In recent weeks, some patients have complained they can't find the drug in pharmacies and fear it's the latest prescription medication to face a shortage.

The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Occupy Updates: L.A. Offers Space, Marchers Arrive In D.C.

At Occupy Los Angeles: Protesters, and one dog, take part in a yoga session.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:34 pm

A small group of Occupy Wall Street supporters who have taken two weeks to walk from New York to Washington, D.C., arrived in the nation's capital today, The Washington Post reports. They're hoping to temporarily occupy a patch of land on the National Mall.

That's one bit of Occupy-related news today. Others:

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Movie Interviews
12:11 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Francis Ford Coppola Reflects On His Film Career

Francis Ford Coppola directed The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather Part II and Dracula. He also co-produced George Lucas' first film, THX 1138.
Kevork Djansezian AP

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:42 pm

Note: In September, Francis Ford Coppola spoke to Cameron Bailey, the director of the Toronto International Film Festival, in front of a sold-out audience at TIFF's Bell Lightbox multiplex. During the discussion, Coppola also took questions from audience members about working with A-list actors, his writing process, screenwriting and rumors about another Godfather movie. Fresh Air is broadcasting excerpts from that 85-minute discussion on today's program.

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The Salt
12:10 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Bush Meat: When Conservation And Child Nutrition Collide

A man prepares an aye-aye, a rare type of lemur found only on the island of Madagascar, for dinner. These primates are an important source of iron and protein despite being critically endangered.
Christopher Golden

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:17 pm

With its big, round eyes and bushy tail, the aye-aye lemur looks like a a cross between a monkey and a squirrel. To many people in Madagascar, it's a tasty, traditional meal, and an excellent source of protein and iron.

But with as few as 1,000 to 10,000 lemurs left on the island, conservationists say they're critically endangered and don't belong on the dinner table.

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