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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Palestinian Unity Would Pose New Headaches

Rival Palestinian leaders met in Cairo this week to discuss prospects for a reconciled government. For more than four years, the Palestinian Authority has governed the West Bank, while the militant Islamist group, Hamas, has ruled the Gaza Strip. But any government that included Hamas would face serious obstacles.

NPR Story
4:16 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Week In Politics: Taking The Country's Pulse

Guy Raz talks with our weekly commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times, about Congress' tough spot, observations on the political divide, economic mobility and disagreement over core values.

Politics
4:09 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Even Lawmakers Ask: Does Anyone Like Congress?

A dark cloud passes over the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Many lawmakers fear that Congress' already low approval rating will sink even further after the failure of the supercommittee.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:55 pm

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Around the Nation
3:42 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Black Friday Madness Sweeps Across The Country

Customers shop for electronics items during Black Friday at a Best Buy in San Diego.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 7:08 am

By the time it opened at 9 p.m. Thursday night for Black Friday, the Toys R Us in New York City's Times Square had a line snaking around the corner from its entrance on 44th Street. It went on for two blocks.

Angela Jenkins was there with two of her girlfriends and no kids. "I left my boyfriend with all of our kids ... by himself," she says with a laugh.

"You gotta do what you gotta do," Jenkins says.

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Music News
3:36 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

New Liturgy Reanimates Catholic Music

Members of the St. Agnes Catholic Church choir sing during Sunday Mass. From left to right: Donald Hukle, Ray Valido, Richard Samp, Jack Grace and Ben Robles.
Peter Maher Courtesy of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:17 pm

When Catholics arrive at church for the beginning of Advent this weekend, they may find themselves stumbling over not only the words, but also the music. The Vatican has changed the English-speaking Mass to make it more faithful to the Latin — and as a result, the sung portions of the Mass often don't work.

It's the most dramatic change in more than 40 years, and it has Mike McMahon working overtime with his choir.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

'Flash Robs' Worry Retailers

A new kind of shoplifting has hit stores in Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. "Flash robs" occur when a group of people organized over social media steal by mobbing a store. Police are advising store employees not to try and stop the robbers, and to take steps to make the quick removal of items difficult.

Research News
3:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Why We Give, Not Why You Think

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 5:16 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

This time of year, pleas for donations are as plentiful as eggnog and door-buster sales. Americans give around $300 billion a year to charity. And as NPR's Alix Spiegel reports, psychologists have started to look more closely at when and why we're motivated to give.

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Europe
3:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Germany's Identity Cemented In The Euro

When the euro was rolled out nearly a decade ago, it was touted as a unifying force across European cultures. Uwe Boek, a 48-year-old Berliner, has seen and embraced these changes: "It's us being Europeans in the European Union. Because the euro is money but the European Union is about identity."

Europe
3:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

For Greeks, A Sad Shift In Self Image

There was a time when Greeks were proud of being Greek, of being a people known for dancing, being happy without material wealth, enjoying life. Now, Greeks are known for being deeply in debt, accused by some of living the high life on other people's money, of dragging Europe's economy to the brink of disaster.

Science
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

IgNobel Prizes Salute The Silly In Science

This year's 21st First Annual IgNobel Prize Ceremony featured the science of sighs, inquiries into the yawning habits of the red-footed tortoise, and songs about the chemistry of coffee. Ira Flatow and Ig master of ceremonies Marc Abrahams present some of the highlights from this year's festivities.

Technology
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Building 'The Big Roads'

In his new book The Big Roads: The Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways writer Earl Swift looks at the history and people behind the world's largest public works project — the U.S. interstate superhighway system.

Food
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Giant Pumpkin, But Forget About Pie

Some pumpkins just aren't meant for the pie pan. Robert Sabin has been growing "Atlantic giant" pumpkins for ten years and says they are more like children than fruit to him. He raises his pumpkins for competition--the heavier, the better.

Health
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

A Tale Of Two Addicts: Freud, Halsted And Cocaine

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 6:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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Science
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Science Diction: The Origin Of 'Stethoscope'

The first stethoscope, invented by the French physician René Laennec, was simply a hollow wooden or ebony tube. Laennec named the device using the Greek roots stethos, or chest, and skopein, to look at or to observe. Medical historian Howard Markel discusses how Laennec came up with the invention. Unlike the stethoscope familiar to patients today, the original device was a simple tube.

News
11:37 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Have The Crackdowns On Immigration Gone Too Far?

Protesters march outside the Alabama Capitol during a demonstration against the state's immigration law in Montgomery, Ala., on Nov. 15.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:29 pm

The architect of Arizona's controversial immigration law has been voted out of office. That law and similar statutes are undergoing difficult court challenges. And the strictest law, in Alabama, has ignited a withering backlash expected to force major changes.

Have the crackdowns on illegal immigration finally gone too far?

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Music Reviews
11:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Iron Butterfly Stretches Its Wings On 'Fillmore East'

Iron Butterfly circa 1970.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Before Led Zeppelin, there was Iron Butterfly — these days, a very misremembered band from Los Angeles. Maybe it was the movie industry all around, but '60s garage-rock in L.A. had an expansive, almost cinematic streak. Iron Butterfly was not the most inventive band on that scene, but it became the most famous because of a single, durable, out-of-nowhere hit, "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida." The song was 17 minutes long, and the proper thing to do on underground radio stations was the play the whole thing.

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Music Interviews
11:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Jay-Z 'Decoded:' The Fresh Air Interview

This interview was originally broadcast on November 16, 2010. Decoded is now available in paperback.

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The Salt
8:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Relax, Folks. It Really Is Honey After All

When is filtered honey really honey? The answer may lie in the politics of imported food.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 8:03 am

Maybe we're too inclined to believe the worst about supermarket food.

How else to explain the reaction to a recent report about honey on the web site Food Safety News? Food Safety News is published by a lawyer who represents plaintiffs in lawsuits against food manufacturers and processors.

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Latin America
7:17 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Brace Yourself: The World Could End In 2012

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 7:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History dismisses claims that the apocalypse is coming, but it's still scrupulously providing evidence. Some people predict catastrophe in 2012, supposedly based on forecasts by the ancient people known as Mayans. Anthropologists now say there are two, not just one, ancient references to December 2012. But they say modern forecasters of doom have still, quote, "twisted the Mayan cosmovision." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
7:08 am
Fri November 25, 2011

World's Worst Soccer Team Finally Wins A Game

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. The world's worst soccer team finally won a game. In 17 years of international play, American Samoa has scored just a dozen goals, compared to the 229 they've allowed. But they scored two this week, to beat Tonga 2-1 in a World Cup qualifying match.

The American Samoans hope their win will raise their ranking. They currently sit at 204th in the world.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

National Security
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

NYPD, FBI Squabble Could Benefit Pimentel's Defense

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 6:37 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Africa
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Egyptian Protests Continue On Friday

Egypt's ruling military council and anti-government protesters are in a standoff. The military council has pledge to hand over power once a newly- elected president and parliament are in place next summer, but protesters have rejected the idea.

Around the Nation
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Demand For Apartments In Denver Outstrips Supply

The housing crisis has stalled home building but apartment construction is undergoing a bit of a renaissance. There's now a huge pool of people forced to rent because they can't afford to buy a home, or they were a victim of foreclosure. In Denver, there aren't enough apartment vacancies. Colorado Public Radio's Ben Markus has the story.

Around the Nation
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Rhode Island Makes Sweeping Changes To Pension System

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Rhode Island had one of the most underfunded pension systems in the country until last week. That's when an overwhelming majority of state lawmakers passed big changes, mostly affecting future retirees. Now those lawmakers are facing angry unions, which are preparing for a legal fight. As Catherine Welch of Rhode Island Public Radio reports, the unions are also hinting at a political battle against those who supported the plan.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Politics
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

'When Did Liberals Become So Unreasonable?'

This week in New York Magazine, two writers from different political parties each critiqued their own side. On Thursday, we heard from conservative David Frum, who argues Republicans lost touch with reality. In the same issue, liberal writer Jonathan Chait also uses the word "fantasy" in describing liberals. He tells Steve Inskeep liberals have become unreasonable.

Asia
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Why Is China's Baby Care Industry Booming?

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 5:31 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Business
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

Business
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Tis The Season For Shopping

On this Black Friday, Linda Wertheimer talks to branding expert Martin Lindstrom about the psychology of sales and the array of techniques retailers use to get people to shop.

Afghanistan
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Afghan Reporters Maneuver Media Minefields

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 6:55 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Afghanistan, a media boom followed the ouster of the Taliban in 2001, but there have been problems. Watchdog groups report hundreds of cases of violence and intimidation against journalists, including murder. Afghan reporters have learned which topics are off-limits, and they take great care to avoid offending the country's powerful. NPR's Ahmad Shafi reports from Kabul.

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Business
4:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Thai Floods Disrupt Computer Hard Drive Supply

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 5:37 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Business News starts with rising computer prices. A component used to make computers has become more expensive. The reason why, is around the world in Southeast Asia. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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