From NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Don't Panic, It Wasn't Lil' Kim

In case anyone's confused. Kim Jong Il is at left. And Lil' Kim is still with us.
Korean Central News Agency / Ian Gavan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 2:28 pm

Just the headline of this Buzz Feed post made us laugh.

"25 People Who Thought Lil Kim Died."

It's funny either way:

-- If some folks were confused by the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

-- Or if they were just making mischief.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Report: So Far, 2011 Safest Year On Record For Air Travel

An airplane takes off.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 2:03 pm

2011 is shaping up to be the safest on record for airline travel, according to analysis of United Nations data by a trade group.

The International Air Transport Association reports that January to November of 2011 are the safest months on record since the U.N. started keeping data in 1945. The 11-month period has also seen a 22 percent improvement in safety from last year.

The Los Angeles Times reports:

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
1:32 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Second Neti-Pot Death From Amoeba Prompts Tap-Water Warning

Keep that tap water β€” and amoebas β€” out of your neti pot.
iStockphoto.com

Washing noses with neti pots or squeeze bottles has become increasingly popular as a home remedy for colds, allergies and sinus trouble. But it's not such a great remedy if it kills you.

Now that two people have died from infection with brain-eating amoebas after using neti pots, doctors are warning: do not put tap water up your nose.

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

What Lessons Should Americans Draw From Iraq War?

The American public, military and the intelligence community were all affected by the Iraq war. Tom Ricks of the Center for a New American Security, retired Marine Col. Gary Anderson and Army veteran Andrew Exum discuss how Americans will remember the war, and what we should learn from it.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Dorfman on Havel: One Playwright Remembers Another

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 2:31 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Future Uncertain For Reclusive North Korea

The death of North Korea's Kim Jong Il leaves many open questions about the secretive country's future. Former Ambassador Christopher Hill and North Korea experts Hazel Smith and Alexander Monsourov discuss how Kim's death may affect the country's relationship with the international community.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

'The Art Of Fielding': Baseball Meets Literature

Chad Harbach's debut novel The Art of Fielding is as much about literary fiction as it is about America's national past time. The book follows the baseball team at a small liberal arts college in Wisconsin β€” with side trips to the big leagues of American literature.

Henry Skrimshander is that college's talented but socially awkward shortstop, destined for big-league stardom. But when a routine throw goes wrong, Henry's life falls apart as he ends up embroiled in conflicts with his teammates, his roommate and a school administrator.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Kim Jong Il's Legacy? 'North Korea Is Dark'

North Korea's borders are outlined.
NASA via Afrikent

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 3:03 pm

There's certainly already been a lot said about North Korea's Kim Jong Il. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has an obit and Planet Money has a recap of how North Korea's economy is fueled by drug dealing and smuggling of counterfeit goods.

Read more
North Korea In Transition
12:28 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

Key Moments In The Rule Of Kim Jong Il

Korean Central News Agency photo released on Jan. 18, 2009, showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Il posing with soldiers.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Kim Jong Il succeeded his father and ruled the secretive nation for 17 years. It was a period that included repeated friction with the international community over North Korea's nuclear weapons program and a devastating famine in the late 1990s that may have been responsible for upwards of 2 million deaths.

The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Mon December 19, 2011

VIDEOS: Christmas-Themed 'Senior Citizen Flash Mobs' Are Spreading

The senior citizens flash mob in Kansas.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:26 pm

Read more
Music Reviews
11:58 am
Mon December 19, 2011

The Left Banke: Teenage Pioneers Of Jangle-Pop

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:24 pm

If you were a New York teenager who played an instrument and wanted to be in a band, and all of a sudden British groups were coming to town and attracting rioting mobs of teenage girls, you might feel a certain urgency to get something together. Tom Finn had already had a band, The Magic Plants, when he ran into a guy named Steve Martin-Caro, a Spanish high-school student who recently arrived in the city, as they attempted to navigate the scene outside the hotel where The Rolling Stones' members were staying in 1965. The two became friends and decided to form another band.

Read more
Presidential Candidates: Did You Know?
11:34 am
Mon December 19, 2011

5 Things You May Not Know About Rick Santorum

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum listens during a presidential debate Oct. 11 at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.
Scott Eells-Pool Getty

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 5:24 pm

Born in the spring of 1958, former Sen. Rick Santorum β€” the son of a psychologist and a nurse β€” was the second of three children in a Catholic family. The Pennsylvania Republican spent most of his childhood in the Pittsburgh suburbs.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:22 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Trent Reznor: The Fresh Air Interview

Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
Frank Micelotta Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 11:43 am

When filmmaker David Fincher asked Nine Inch Nails' Trent Reznor and his songwriting partner Atticus Ross to compose the music for his U.S. film adaptation of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Fincher had one request: for the music to sound 'textural.'

So Reznor and Ross, who won an Oscar for their score of Fincher's 2010 film The Social Network, experimented with sounds created by stretched-out bell tones, piano beds filled with nails and clothespins, and mixes of distorted instruments played imperfectly.

Read more
The Salt
11:19 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Why Are We More Hungry In The Winter?

Our drive to eat more in the winter may be a product of less sunlight β€” or more temptation around us.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 11:24 am

If you feel hungrier as winter draws near, you're not alone. Even though most of us spend our days in climate-controlled offices and homes, our appetites seem to change when the days grow shorter. Some researchers say it's our primitive impulses promting us to stockpile calories for the winter ahead.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:10 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Violent Crime Drops Again, FBI Reports

From the Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 11:12 am

The number of violent crimes reported by 12,500 U.S. law enforcement agencies fell 6.4 percent in the first half of this year compared to the same time in 2010, the FBI reports.

And in its Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report the bureau also says that property crimes were down 3.7 percent.

Read more
Europe
10:56 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Tied To Trade, Dutch Economy Falls With The Tide

The flower auction house in Aalsmeer, the Netherlands, is one of the largest in the world β€” and a part of the country's strong export base. As Europe's debt crisis continues, the Dutch economy is feeling the effects of being heavily reliant on world trade.
Pan Zhi Xinhua /Landov

The debt crisis in Europe got under way in small, heavily indebted countries like Greece and Ireland, but these days it's also being felt in the wealthy heartland.

The Dutch government says the country probably slipped into a recession at the end of this year, and like other countries, it's having to consider budget cuts.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:45 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Boehner: House Will Reject Deal On Tax Cut, Benefits; Senate Should Stay On Job

Saying again that it's wrong to enact two-month extensions of payroll tax cuts and jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) just told reporters that he expects the House will this evening reject the deal to do just that, which passed the Senate by an overwhelmingly bipartisan majority on Saturday.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:15 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Who Is Kim Jong Un? Who Really Knows?

North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency distributed this photo of Kim Jong Un on Sept. 23.
hand-out AFP/Getty Images

It's been two years since Kim Jong Un effectively became North Korea's "Great Successor" and heir to the seat of power in the communist nation run by a family dynasty β€” a dynasty that began with his grandfather, Kim Il Sung (the "Great Leader") and continued with his father, Kim Jong Il (the "Dear Leader").

But in that time about the only new thing we know is that he's two years older and now thought to be in his late 20s. And, that he appears about to become at least the titular head of an impoverished nation that threatens its richer neighbor to the south with nuclear weapons

Read more
Asia
10:03 am
Mon December 19, 2011

North Korea Faces Choices In Post-Kim Jong Il World

What's next now that Kim Jong Il is dead?

Kim, whose official age was 69 but who actually was 70, died Saturday of a heart attack, according to North Korean state media.

He leaves behind a pretty much officially designated heir, his son Kim Jong Un, whose age is about 29. The young man has been given exalted titles including full general but has little experience compared with what his father had under his belt when Kim Jong Il's own father and predecessor, Kim Il Sung, died in 1994.

Read more
It's All Politics
9:04 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Two Weeks Before Caucuses, Many Iowans Still Wavering

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann visits with Pastor Marvin Smith III at the Harvest Baptist Church on Dec. 18 in Fort Dodge, Iowa.
Eric Gay AP

Only two weeks to go until Iowa Republicans head to their caucuses to begin choosing a presidential nominee and NPR's Pam Fessler reports on Monday's Morning Edition that many are still trying to decide who will win their votes.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

More Than 30 Percent Of Americans Arrested By Age 23, Study Says

The arrest of an Occupy DC protester earlier this month in Washington β€” one type of arrest that would show up in the researchers' numbers.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

There's been a sharp increase in recent decades in the number of young Americans who report they've been arrested at least once, researchers report in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

While in the mid-1960s about 22 percent of Americans reported having been arrested by the time they turned 23, researchers estimate that the "prevalence rate" for arrests by that age now lies "between 30.2 percent and 41.4 percent."

Read more
The Two-Way
8:15 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Top Stories: Kim Jong Il's Death, Philippines Disaster, Payroll Tax Impasse

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 8:20 am

Good morning.

The major story of the past 12 hours or so, as we've been reporting, is the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:55 am
Mon December 19, 2011

For 'The Economist,' Kim Jong Il's Death Means 'Farewell, Earthlings'

The Economist

Known for its sometimes irreverent way of illustrating world events, The Economist magazine has over the years been quite creative when it's cover subject was North Korean leader Kim Jong Il (who died Saturday at the age of 69).

He was "Rocket man" in 2006. The image showed him blasting off into space.

Read more
Around the Nation
7:35 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Santa Claus Chimney Move Backfires On Calif. Teen

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A teenager in Northern California pulled a Santa last week when he shimmied down his parents' chimney. He wasn't carrying gifts but guilt for staying out past his curfew. Predictably, George Herrera got stuck, for 90 minutes until an emergency crew arrived and saw something you usually see in Christmas cartoons - feet dangling from the fireplace. The teen now knows why it takes a jolly old elf to get down a chimney. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:27 am
Mon December 19, 2011

High School Student Suspended For Tebowing

Tyler Carroll organized a kneel-down at his Long Island high school last week, and about 40 students participated. The superintendent called it a safety hazard because the Tebowing blocked the hallways. Carroll serves his suspension on Monday.

Asia
7:20 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Chinese React To Kim Jong Il's Death With Emoticons

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 7:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We've been following the reaction this morning to the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. The response of many Chinese is coming through in emoticons, symbols often used in text messages.

The Wall Street Journal reports Kim's death is the most popular topic on China's equivalent of Twitter. And among the more than million posts about him are many decorated with laughing emoticons and victory symbols. But just as many however show broken hearts and candles.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Former Czech President, Playwright Vaclav Havel Dies At 75

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 7:20 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

If there were a world leader who was the opposite of Kim Jong Il, it might have been former Czech President Vaclav Havel, a man who wanted to believe that truth and love must prevail over hate and lies. Havel died yesterday. He was 75.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Former Child Soldier In Sudan Helps U.S. Exit Iraq

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 7:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It's not clear how the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il will affect nuclear talks. Just ahead, we'll explore the concerns about the power transition in the secretive communist state.

Read more
NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Fight Over Extending Payroll Tax Cut Flares Up Again

House Republicans are rejecting a bipartisan compromise approved overwhelmingly by the Senate Saturday. The deal would have extended the payroll tax holiday and unemployment benefits through February.

Asia
4:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

North Korea Power Vacuum Ups Security Concerns

The death of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has raised security concerns in the Korean peninsula and Asia in general. Linda Wertheimer talks to Stephen Bosworth, former U.S. special representative for North Korea and dean of The Fletcher School at Tufts University, about how dangerous the situation is on the Korean peninsula.

Pages