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Economy
1:00 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

Why Your Job Search Shouldn't Take A Holiday

Many job seekers assume they won't make much progress in their search over the holidays. Not so, says Lauren Weber of The Wall Street Journal. Weber explains why job hunters may want to consider keeping their search alive through the holiday season.

Education
1:00 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

Brutal Incidents Shine Light On Band Hazing Culture

The death of Florida A&M drum major Robert Champion, Jr. continues to reverberate at schools nationwide. His death exposed a hazing culture unfamiliar to many, but band directors and school administrators have been dealing with the problem for many years.

The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

White House: It's Time For Killing In Syria To Stop

In a statement from the president's press secretary, the United States called on Syrian President Bashar Assad to stop killing protesters.

"The United States is deeply disturbed by credible reports that the Assad regime continues to indiscriminately kill scores of civilians and army defectors, while destroying homes and shops and arresting protesters without due process," Press Secretary Jay Carney said in a statement.

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The Salt
12:44 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

What A Global Flavor Map Can Tell Us About How We Pair Foods

Each node in this network denotes an ingredient, the color indicates food category, and node size reflects the ingredient prevalence in recipes. Two ingredients are connected if they share a significant number of flavor compounds, and link thickness representing the number of shared compounds between the two ingredients.
Yong-Yeol Ahn, Sebastian E. Ahnert, James P. Bagrow, and Albert-László Barabási

There's a reason why Asian dishes often taste so different from the typical North American fare: North American recipes rely on flavors that are related, while East Asian cooks go for sharp contrasts.

That's the word from researchers at the University of Cambridge, who used a tool called network analysis to chart the relationship between chemical flavor compounds. They did it to test the widely believed notion that foods with compatible flavors are chemically similar.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

NewtGingrich.com Is Sending Surfers To Sites And Stories He Wouldn't Like

Looking for Newt Gingrich? Don't type "newtgingrich.com." You might get directed to Freddie Mac, Tiffany's or other sites that bring to mind less flattering stories about the Republican presidential candidate.
FreddieMac.com

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich's official campaign website — at newt.org — is working fine.

But if anyone types "newtgingrich.com" and hits enter right now, they're not going to see things that the former House speaker would find very funny.

In the last few minutes when we've done that we've been directed to:

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World
12:14 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

2011 Has Been A Rough Year For Dictators

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, whose death was announced Monday, was in power for 17 years. He succeeded his father, who ruled for nearly a half-century. Kim is shown here on Aug. 24 during a visit to Russia.
Dmitry Astakhov AFP/Getty Images/Emily Bogle

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:11 am

Dictators suddenly seem to have a lot less longevity. This year, several of the world's longest-serving autocrats have either died or been ousted from power.

The death of North Korea's Kim Jong Il from heart failure had nothing to do with the Arab uprisings that ousted four leaders who had been in power for decades — Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Moammar Gadhafi of Libya, Ali Abdullah Saleh of Yemen and Zine El Abidine Ben Ali of Tunisia.

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Music Reviews
12:09 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

El Rego: A Singer From Benin With Soul And Funk

El Rego, the godfather of Benin funk, and his band The Commandos.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 12:16 pm

It may seem counter-intuitive, but the history of world music proves that unfamiliar instruments and rhythms cross borders much more readily than vocal styles. There's no question that, starting in the late '60s, soul and then funk became very popular in sub-Saharan Africa. Decades of reissues show that a lot of players found their way into electric guitar, and that enriching the big beat of the West was a cinch for African percussionists.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:02 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

After 25 Years In Woman's Stomach, A Pen Still Writes

CT scan proves woman was right. She did swallow a pen 25 years ago.
Courtesy of BMJ Case Reports

Originally published on Tue December 27, 2011 10:32 am

You might have heard about the case on Wednesday's Morning Edition.

Twenty-five years ago, a British woman who saw a spot on a tonsil tried to get a better look using a pen and a mirror. She slipped and the pen went down her throat.

Neither the woman's husband nor her doctor believed her. X-rays at the time didn't detect the pen. Now, "they are eating their words," as NPR's Linda Wertheimer put it.

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Movie Reviews
11:52 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Stirring Adventures, At Home (In A Zoo) And Abroad

Matt Damon gets up close and personal with one of his new four-legged family members in We Bought A Zoo.
Neal Preston Twentieth Century Fox

After being force-fed a steady diet of Oscar hopefuls for almost a month, I may just be ready for empty-calorie time at the cineplex. But I have to confess a sense of relief this week, as I watched entertainments that didn't seem to want to do anything other than show an audience a good time.

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Anti-Government Protests Roil Egypt
11:40 am
Wed December 21, 2011

A Foreign Correspondent Reflects On The Arab Spring

Photographer Moises Saman captured this shot of two activists in Hama, Syria. Saman and journalist Anthony Shadid entered the city for several days last July. The rest of Saman's images can be found here.
Moises Saman The New York Times

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 12:55 pm

Veteran war correspondent Anthony Shadid spent much of the past decade in Baghdad covering the Iraq war, first for The Washington Post and then for The New York Times. Last December, Shadid left Baghdad for his home in Beirut, Lebanon, where he's been based for more than a decade.

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The Two-Way
11:20 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Criminal Charges For English Soccer Star John Terry Over Alleged Racial Abuse

John Terry, right, and opponent Anton Ferdinand during the English Premier League on Oct. 23 in which it's alleged that Terry hurled a racial slur at Ferdinand. Terry denies doing that. He's going to face criminal charges.
Nick Potts AP

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 11:22 am

One of England's biggest soccer stars is going to face criminal charges for allegedly aiming a racial slur at an opponent.

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Presidential Candidates: Did You Know?
10:52 am
Wed December 21, 2011

5 Things You May Not Know About Jon Huntsman

GOP hopeful Jon Huntsman speaks in Milford, N.H., on Dec. 8.
Cheryl Senter AP

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 2:58 pm

He is former governor of Utah and the namesake of a very rich man. His father, a Salt Lake City bazillionaire, owns a chemical company that really blossomed when it created packaging for McDonald's Big Macs. His father also served in the Nixon administration, so Jon Huntsman Jr. lived in Washington as a young boy.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:49 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Patients Want To Read Doctors' Notes, But Many Doctors Balk

Wouldn't you love to know what she's jotting down? Of course you would.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 11:17 am

Doctors write about their patients all the time, in notes detailing office visits and treatments. But for patients, those notes are a closed book.

Maybe the doctor has scribbled that the patient was "difficult," as Elaine discovered when she peeked at her chart in a memorable Seinfeld episode. When her dermatologist saw her snooping, he grabbed the chart out of her hands.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Sales Of Existing Homes Rose In November; Previous Years Revised Down

A "sold" sign outside a home in Pasadena, Calif., in September 2009. New data show fewer such sales that year.
David McNew Getty Images

While it says sales of existing homes rose 4 percent in November from October and were 12.2 percent above the level of November 2010, the National Association of Realtors also reported today that revisions to its data show there were about 2.9 million fewer homes sold from the start of 2007 through the end of 2010 than previously thought.

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The Salt
9:57 am
Wed December 21, 2011

South Dakota Buffalo Farmers Relish Bison Meat Boom

Shane Brown, a butcher with the Wild Idea Buffalo Company, labels packages of ground bison.
Charles Michael Ray/SDPB

2011 wasn't a banner year for the stock market, and anyone heavily invested in the Euro zone might be biting their nails right now. But if your business is buffalo, you may be looking at some very happy holidays.

The buffalo market is booming. Look no further than the buffalo ambling across the wide open South Dakota prairie munching on grass as they go. Bison raised on grass don't require corn or grains to fatten up. That's part of why they're seen by many as better for the environment.

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Army Charges 8 Soldiers In Connection With Private's Death In Afghanistan

Charges including negligent homicide, involuntary manslaughter and dereliction of duty have been brought against eight American soldiers in connection with what was thought to be the Oct.

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It's All Politics
9:01 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Taking Nothing For Granted, Romney Launches N.H. Bus Tour

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets voters after his campaign speech in Bedford, N.H. on Dec. 20.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 11:06 am

All eyes are on Iowa this week, but former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is far away — on a campaign bus tour in must-win New Hampshire.

As NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on Wednesday's Morning Edition, somehow there are still New Hampshire voters who remain undecided about Romney — despite the fact that he's practically camped out in their living rooms for the last four years.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Accused Of Sexually Abusing Children Decades Ago, Sportswriter Retires

July 23, 2011: Sportswriter Bill Conlin speaking at the National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 8:44 am

Bill Conlin, a Philadelphia Daily News sportswriter for 46 years and this year's winner of the National Baseball Hall of Fame's award for "meritorious contributions to baseball writing," retired Tuesday after three women and a man came forward to accuse him of molesting them in the 1970s when they were between the ages of 7 and 12.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Mood In North Korean Capital Is 'Subdued But Calm,' U.K. Diplomat Says

This image taken today from North Korean TV footage shows people mourning for Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang.
AFP/Getty Images

While North Koreans in Pyongyang are "in a state of mourning and ... paying their respects at landmarks across the city," the overall mood is "subdued but calm" as people there react to Saturday's death of leader Kim Jong Il and the likelihood that his son Kim Jong Un is now in charge, according to one of Britain's diplomats in the capital city.

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Strange News
7:16 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Pen Removed 25 Years After Woman Swallowed It

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:35 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Picture this: A woman in Britain felt a lump in her throat. She tried to take a closer look with a mirror and a pen, but slipped and fell and swallowed the pen. It sounded so improbable, her doctor and her husband did not believe her.

Twenty-five years later, they're eating their words. The woman just had the pen removed. She is in good health - and the pen still works. Doctors scribbled "hello" on a piece of paper.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
7:10 am
Wed December 21, 2011

6-Year-Old British Boy Wins $4,700 Pie In Raffle

Mince pies are a centuries-old Christmas tradition. And this year, a six-year-old boy in England won the most expensive mince pie in the world. A London pie maker raffled it off. To make the $4,7000 dessert, he used rare ingredients. And, buried in the holiday treat was a solid platinum coin worth nearly $1,000.

Business
6:47 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Booming Buffalo Market Comes With Growing Pains

More consumers are turning to buffalo meat as a healthier choice that's often better for the environment. South Dakota is the biggest producer of buffalo, and ranchers there say their biggest challenge is keeping up with the demand.

Media
6:43 am
Wed December 21, 2011

CNN's Piers Morgan Testifies In Phone-Hacking Case

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:35 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It was a reversal for CNN celebrity interviewer Piers Morgan yesterday. He had to answer questions about journalists in Britain hacking into phone messages and bribing police. A scandal about press practices has struck at the heart of Rupert Murdoch's media empire in the UK and has led to more than 20 arrests.

NPR's David Folkenflik reports that Morgan insisted he had no involvement in or knowledge of any of it back when he was a high profile tabloid editor in London.

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Election 2012
6:30 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Romney, Gingrich Spar Over Negative Super PAC Ads

There's a spirited debate going on between GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich. A Super PAC called Restore Our Future is running negative ads against Gingrich on Romney's behalf. Gingrich called on Romney to get the ads off the air. Romney responded by saying the law does not allow him to communicate with a Super PAC.

It's All Politics
5:01 am
Wed December 21, 2011

In A Year Of Partisan Brawls, Congress Goes One More Round

President Obama speaks in the White House's Brady Briefing Room on Tuesday. Behind the president, a ticking clock counts down the time until taxes will go up if Congress can't reach an extension deal on payroll tax cuts.
Haraz N. Ghanbari AP

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:35 am

In a year of deadlines and political fights, Congress is closing with one last partisan brawl. At stake are billions of dollars in tax breaks and unemployment benefits for millions of Americans set to expire Jan. 1.

Just in case you've been out buying presents, working or not watching C-SPAN with bated breath, what happened Tuesday was that the House — specifically Republicans in the House — rejected a bill that had broad bipartisan support in the Senate.

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Election 2012
4:40 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Romney Focuses On N.H. Primary Over Iowa Caucuses

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Most of the Republican presidential candidates are focusing their campaign efforts on Iowa at the moment; the first-in-the-nation caucuses there are less than two weeks away.

But not former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. He's hundreds of miles away from Iowa, in New Hampshire. And today he's setting off on a three-day tour of the state, eyeing an early primary win.

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Business
4:38 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Why Do Americans Bother To Fly Over The Holidays?

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:35 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Many Americans begin their holidays with travel, and complaining about that travel is quickly becoming a favorite national pastime. Long lines, small seats, hidden fees for everything from carry-ons to a can of Coke - the list goes on. To help us understand why this is the new reality, we reached Seth Kaplan. He's the editor of Airline Weekly.

Mr. Kaplan, good morning.

SETH KAPLAN: Good morning, Linda.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Business News

Linda Wertheimer has business news.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Wed December 21, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne has the Last Word in business.

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