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The Salt
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

What's To Love And Loathe About Chocolate Milk?

Melissa Forsyth/NPR

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:03 am

Chocolate milk has an interesting rap these days. Endurance athletes increasingly love it as a recovery drink.

And who's loathing it? Schools — advocates for school food reform, to be more specific. They argue it's got too much added sugar and too many calories.

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Business
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Small Businesses Feel Crunch Of Italy's Debt Woes

Enrico Frare owns a small clothing company in Italy. He says it's so difficult to get credit in Italy right now some businesses are being forced to leave.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Enrico Frare isn't a well known name in Italian business. The 36-year-old runs E-group, a small clothing company in the commercial region around Treviso that makes winter sportswear.

But last month, Frare did something that attracted a lot of attention. He bought a full-page ad in Milan's main newspaper appearing in what might politely be called his birthday suit. The caption read: "Every day in Italy an entrepreneur risks losing his shirt."

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Governing
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

For Debt Committee, No Final Hour Deal Apparent

Monday is the last day the congressional supercommittee can reach a deficit reduction deal and still make its Wednesday deadline. The legislation has to be publicly available for 48 hours before a vote and the clock is ticking, but instead of announcing an agreement, it is widely expected the committee will admit it has failed.

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Around the Nation
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Can Electric Cars Help Automakers Reach 55 MPG?

A Nissan Leaf charges at a station in Portland, Ore., that can recharge an electric car in 30 minutes. Electric cars could be an integral part of meeting 55-mpg fuel standards by 2025, but many consumers are put off by the vehicles' higher price and what some call "range anxiety."
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:07 pm

First in a three-part series

Under fuel-economy rules announced by the White House this summer, cars will have to get an average of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 — nearly double the current average. Reaching that goal will take not only feats of engineering but also changing how Americans think about their cars and how they drive them.

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Planet Money
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Why A New York Cheese Buyer Hangs On The Euro's Fate

Aaron Foster, with cheese.
David Kestenbaum NPR

Among the chilly aisles at Murray's Cheese Shop in Manhattan, the entire continent of Europe is represented. Something like 60 percent of the cheese in Murray's comes from the continent, according to Aaron Foster, a cheese buyer at the store.

For all the talk about how the European debt crisis is effecting the global economy, it can be hard to connect it with daily life here in the U.S. Here's one link: Aaron Foster's bonus depends on how cheaply he can buy cheese from Europe. And the price of that cheese is driven largely by the strength (or weakness) of the euro.

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Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Santorum: Early Political Work Influences Him Still

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum greets voters this summer in Iowa. The Republican presidential hopeful has spent most of his professional life in politics.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 12:50 pm

Seventh in a series

Presidential candidate Rick Santorum consistently polls near the bottom of the Republican pack. But he appears undeterred in his bid for the White House. Santorum's work life in his 20s provides some insight into why he perseveres despite long odds.

The former senator from Pennsylvania is best known for his conservative social positions, especially his opposition to abortion rights and gay marriage. He's also known for expressing what he thinks very frankly.

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Opinion
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Bringing A Bollywood Celebre-Baby Into The World

Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai arrive at the World Premiere of Raavan at the BFI Southbank on June 16, 2010 in London, England.
Gareth Cattermole AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 12:00 pm

India is celebrating the birth of a baby to two of its biggest Bollywood stars. Commentator Sandip Roy explains why the birth is making headlines.

Last week, India got the tweet it was holding its breath for: It's a girl.

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, the Bollywood actress often called the most beautiful woman in the world, gave birth to a daughter. The proud dad, Abhishek Bachchan, a Bollywood hero in his own right, sent out the first tweet. Followed moments later by his dad, Bollywood's biggest superstar, Amitabh Bachchan.

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Movies
12:01 am
Mon November 21, 2011

For Muppeteers, It Isn't Easy Being Invisible

Anchorphibian: Kermit the Frog does the backstage-chat thing with Amy Adams and Jason Segel in The Muppets.
Scott Garfield Disney

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:51 am

Sound Stage 28 at Universal Studios in Burbank, Calif., looks like any other Hollywood set — littered with wires, crew members everywhere. We pick our way through cables and cameras and stuff that would make Oscar the Grouch's trash can look tidy.

But then we head up — up a flight of wooden stairs that leads to the old set of the 1925 Lon Chaney silent film The Phantom of the Opera. It's draped with dusty red-velvet swags, and it looks like it might still harbor a ghost or two.

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Television
5:48 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Roger Craig poses with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after winning $250,000 in last week's Tournament of Champions.
Carol Kaelson Sony Pictures

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

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Your Money
5:04 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

For Retirees, Selling Pensions A Risky Bet

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:37 pm

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Libya Weighs Life After Gadhafi

It's been one month since Moammar Gadhafi's death. Libyans were celebrating within hours of his killing. A month later, the jubilance has waned and the violence continues. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with New York Times correspondent Clifford Krauss from Tripoli.

Africa
3:00 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Egyptian Security Cracks Down In Tahrir Square

A second uprising seems to be developing in Cairo. Protesters in Tahrir Square, angry with the military-led transitional government, increased in number recently as police clashes with them have become more violent. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with reporter Merrit Kennedy about the situation in Egypt.

Science
2:29 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

In Baltimore, Mapping The World Of Addiction

Addicts' movements around Baltimore are mapped onto images like this, showing levels of violence in each neighborhood. Other maps track things like visible drug use and vacant housing-- all factors that may contribute to an addict's decision to use drugs.
Dr. Debra Furr-Holden Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

In East Baltimore, not far from rows of abandoned homes and empty warehouses, there's a space-age high rise housing an unusual methadone clinic.

"People come here and participate in studies, and in return they get treatment," Dr. Kenzie Preston tells Laura Sullivan, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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Author Interviews
2:15 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Bill Maher Lays Down The (Mostly Silly) Law

Comedian Bill Maher is the host of the HBO political commentary show, Real Time With Bill Maher.
Janet Van Ham AP

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

Comedian Bill Maher wraps up every installment of his TV show, Real Time, with a segment called "New Rules." That's where he takes potshots at whatever's bothering him — from wrappers on ice cream cones, to red light cameras, to more serious subjects like war and economic ruin.

His new book, The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass, sports a title we can't say on the radio and a mix of rules both lighthearted and serious, some of which never appeared on television.

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Politics
11:36 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Prospects For Supercommittee Debt Deal Look Dim

Time is short for the congressional supercommittee to find $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions, but the prospects of a deal are dim.

Several committee members hit the airwaves to say why the panel is on the verge of failure. Democrats insist the problem is Republicans' steadfast unwillingness to raise taxes on the wealthy. While Republicans, including Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey, say Democrats aren't willing to make serious cuts to Medicare and Medicaid.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sun November 20, 2011

VIDEO: After Pepper-Spraying, A Powerfully Silent Protest At UC Davis

University of California Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi walked through a three-block long group of silent protesters Friday night after campus police used pepper spray on some protesters earlier in the day. There have been calls for her resignation.
http://www.youtube.com/lhfang86

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Politics
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

What's At Stake, For The Supercommitee And Us

The supercommittee, charged with cutting federal deficits by at least $1.2 trillion over the next decade, is down to the final days before its Nov. 23 deadline, and the group appears to be at an impasse. NPR's Tamara Keith and Mara Liasson talk with host Audie Cornish to explain both the economic and political consequences of supercommittee success or failure.

Strange News
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

No 'I' In 'Team': Yale-Harvard Game Makes QB Choose

A chance for a Rhodes Scholarship, or the chance to battle your arch-rival football team? Yale quarterback Patrick Witt faced this agonizing choice; Audie Cornish has more.

Middle East
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Fighting In Tahrir Square Leads Egypt Elections

A night of intense clashes between protesters and police in Cairo has left hundreds injured and two dead. This comes just eight days before Egypt's first parliamentary election since former President Hosni Mubarak stepped down in February. Merrit Kennedy in Cairo reports that protesters are angry about the way the ruling military council has handled the transition period.

Politics
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Obama Trip Spotlights Asia, But Can U.S. Refocus?

President Obama returns to Washington Sunday after an unusually long, 10-day trip to Asia. The president is keen to spread the word that the U.S. is shifting its focus to the region, which he sees as a major source for economic growth and new U.S. jobs in the coming century. Host Audie Cornish talks to NPR's Anthony Kuhn in Bali, Indonesia, about what the trip achieved.

Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Pearl Harbor Survivors Meet For The Last Time

This weekend, the Southeastern chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors held its final meeting. Seventy years have passed since the attack on Pearl Harbor and surviving membership is dwindling, so the worldwide organization has finally decided to disband. Kate Sweeney of member station WABE reports.

Afghanistan
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

U.S. Drawdown Doesn't Satisfy Some Afghans

Afghan leaders have wrapped up their latest grand assembly, known as a loya jirga, where delegates from all over Afghanistan discussed topics key to the country's future. Among the issues they discussed was the level of U.S. involvement after the 2014 drawdown. Host Audie Cornish talks with Alissa Rubin of The New York Times for more.

Digital Life
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

The U.S. Army? There's An App For That

The U.S. Army is working to use smartphones on the battlefield as a way to keep soldiers connected and give them better tools. Specialist Nicholas Johnson has designed a group of applications meant to help troops on the ground. Host Audie Cornish has more.

Africa
8:00 am
Sun November 20, 2011

South African Farms Still Short Black Farmers

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 1:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In South Africa, the topic of homeownership comes down to land and race. At the end of apartheid, the new South African government laid out many plans for achieving economic and social equality, which included land reform. The government hoped to transfer nearly a third of all white-owned farmlands into black ownership by 2014. But as Anders Kelto reports, they're falling well short of that goal.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRDS CHIRPING)

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Politics
7:51 am
Sun November 20, 2011

GOP Hopefuls Open Up In Bid For Christian Vote

Republican presidential candidates Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former CEO of Godfather's Pizza Herman Cain talk after a forum sponsored by The Family Leader Saturday. Both men let their emotions show during the roundtable.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 1:51 pm

Six Republican presidential hopefuls gathered in Des Moines, Iowa, Saturday, and each made a pitch for the state's very important Christian conservative vote.

The event was not a debate, but a roundtable discussion. The candidates sat side-by-side at what was described as a Thanksgiving table, complete with pumpkins and autumn leaves. Not present at the table was former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who chose not to attend.

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Around the Nation
6:11 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Young, Gay And Homeless: Fighting For Resources

Tiffany Cocco (left to right), Jeremiah Beaverly, Carl Siciliano and Avi Bowie hang out at the Ali Forney Center in Manhattan.
Margot Adler NPR

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:10 pm

A number of studies of homeless youth in big cities put forth a startling statistic: Depending on the study, somewhere between 30 and 40 percent of homeless youths identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.

It's largely because gay youths are more often kicked out of their homes than straight youths. And even if they are not kicked out, they may feel so uncomfortable that they leave.

In New York City, nearly 4,000 young people are homeless every night — many of them gay.

Reaching Out To Homeless Youths

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World
6:10 am
Sun November 20, 2011

New U.S. Strategy On Afghanistan Hinges On Pakistan

Pakistani protesters shout slogans during a protest in Multan on Oct. 14 against U.S. drone attacks in Pakistani tribal areas. Officials said U.S. drone strikes on Oct. 13 killed 10 militants, including a senior commander in the Haqqani network. Drone attacks are one way the U.S. hopes to squeeze the Haqqani militants.
AFP/Getty Images

As the drawdown of American combat troops in Afghanistan nears, the U.S. is facing an increasingly dangerous opponent. The Pakistan-based Haqqani network, allied with the Taliban, is believed to be behind a recent string of deadly attacks in Afghanistan, and it's forcing the U.S. to rethink an earlier strategy for stabilizing the country.

But the strategy hinges on help and cooperation from Pakistan — which is never a sure thing.

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Business
6:09 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Border-Town Factories Give Manufacturers An Edge

Employees of TECMA, a cross-border plant or maquiladora, work in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Business leaders say the quick delivery time of goods from Mexico to the U.S. can help revive manufacturing in North America.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 1:51 pm

Officials in the United States have been wringing their hands lately over how to revitalize domestic manufacturing and keep factories from moving overseas.

But not all of those plants are going across the ocean to China or India or some other low-cost production hub in Asia. Many are relocating just south of the border to Mexico, prompting business leaders to argue that the U.S.-Mexico border region may be the key to rejuvenating manufacturing in North America.

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Music Interviews
1:58 am
Sun November 20, 2011

The Man Behind The Music Of 'Entourage' Sets The Tone

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America. The finale of the second season airs Sunday night on HBO.
Jeff Forney HBO

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Science
5:15 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Arson Forensics Sets Old Fire Myths Ablaze

A fire burns in a scale model of a living room in the ATF's Fire Research Lab in Beltsville, Maryland. Until the development of the FRL, there were no fire measurement facilities in the U.S., or anywhere, dedicated to the specific needs of the fire investigation community.
Courtesy of the ATF

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 10:27 pm

In 1990, a fire broke out in a house in Jacksonville, Fla., killing two women and four children. The husband of one of the women became the prime suspect, and that's when a fire investigator named John Lentini was called in.

At the time, Lentini says, the initial evidence pointed to a fire that was deliberately set. He calculated that it would have taken about 20 minutes for the house to become engulfed in flames — what's called a flashover — leaving plenty of time for someone to set the fire and get out.

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