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The Salt
3:04 am
Tue June 26, 2012

The Making of Meat-Eating America

Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s.
Lass Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:44 pm

We eat a lot of meat in this country; per person, more than almost anywhere else on Earth. (Here's a helpful map of global meat-eating.)

But why? What makes an American eat ten or twelve times more meat than the average person in Mozambique or Bangladesh?

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Fine Art
3:02 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reflective Art Brings Light, Color To Historic Spaces

Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot's Red Bowl installation in Beauvais, France, recalls the way lepers once bathed in animal blood in an effort to cure themselves and avoid being ostracized to the one-time leprosarium where the installation is located.
Courtesy of Cao | Perrot Studio

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 1:03 pm

This is a story about amazing beauty, imagination and magical effects — and it begins, ironically enough, at a one-time leprosarium, or hospital for lepers, in Beauvais, France, a small town outside Paris.

Lepers were sequestered in Beauvais in the 12th century. That history is now noted in an outdoor art installation made up of slim metal rods that curve up into the shape of a bowl. Each rod is tipped with a red, marble-sized glass ball.

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The Record
8:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Springsteen's American Dream, Beautiful And Bleak

Bruce Springsteen onstage during the Born in the USA tour in 1985.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:39 pm

I fell in love with Bruce Springsteen for his swagger. It was ridiculous and offered so much hope. Here was a bony dude with the worst haircut ever, who wore T-shirts covered in holes — seriously, he looked like the fry cook at the amusement park where I worked as a counter girl in the summer — making music as big as the known universe.

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All Tech Considered
7:40 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Facebook Changed Your Primary Email Address, But Says It Warned You

Facebook recently changed all its users' primary email addresses.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:28 am

A key change was made to your Facebook profile recently that you may not have noticed yet. Facebook has replaced the primary email address users entered in their profile contact information with brand-new @facebook.com addresses. These addresses allow you to email external accounts from your Facebook inbox. Forbes first noticed the change:

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The Two-Way
7:33 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Phelps And Lochte Set To Square Off In Olympic Trials Final

Michael Phelps swims in a preliminary heat at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials in Omaha, Nebraska. Phelps and rival Ryan Lochte were awoken from their afternoon naps by a fire alarm at their hotel Monday.
Al Bello Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 8:35 pm

The London Olympics are still more than a month away, but fans of swimming were eager to see the 2012 edition of the rivalry between Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte get started Monday, when the two Olympic gold medalists face off in the final of the 400-meter individual medley at the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Update at 8:32 p.m. Lochte Beats Phelps

Lochte defeated Phelps at the U.S. Olympic swimming trials.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

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The Two-Way
6:55 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Greek Workers Find Ancient Highway In Subway Dig

Officials unveiled an ancient road found during construction of Thessaloniki's new subway system Monday.
Nikolas Giakoumidis AP

A Greek city's new subway project has led to the discovery of an ancient road made of marble that was laid nearly 2,000 years ago. The road in Thessaloniki is made of paving stones that show signs of use by both horse-drawn carriages and local children, the AP reports.

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The Two-Way
6:35 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Facebook Names Sheryl Sandberg To Board

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg was named Monday to the company's board of directors. Sandberg is the first woman on Facebook's board.
Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 6:43 am

Facebook now has a woman on its board of directors: The company announced Monday that Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg would join the board.

Sandberg, the company's No.2 executive, was hired away from Google in 2008.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:40 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Could Kaiser Permanente's Low-Cost Health Care Be Even Cheaper?

George Halvorson, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente, speaks during a session at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2009.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Kaiser Permanente rose out of Henry J. Kaiser's utopian, industrialist dream.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:30 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Why Are Women More Likely To Die From Lung Cancer In Alabama?

Back in 1998, Colleen Maxwell, then a 23-year-old student, smoked outside a San Diego bar, just weeks after California became the the first state in the nation to to ban smoking in most bars and gambling casinos.
Joan C Fahrenthold AP

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 8:46 am

California has long been a trendsetter. But when it comes to reducing smoking and lung cancer, the Golden State's success hasn't taken the entire nation by storm.

Just take a look at the chart, which shows lung cancer death rates among white women by the year they were born.

For those women born since 1933, lung cancer death rates in California have dropped by more than half. In Alabama, they've more than doubled.

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Law
5:13 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

High Court Leaves Core Of Immigration Law Intact

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To the Supreme Court now and a much-anticipated decision on Arizona's controversial immigration law. The justices struck down most of SB1070, as the law is known. But the court did unanimously allow one key provision to take effect, and that's giving both sides reason to claim victory. We'll delve more deeply into the ruling with Nina Totenberg elsewhere in the program, but now to reaction from Arizona and NPR's Ted Robbins.

And Ted, let's start first with the three provisions of this law that were blocked. What were they?

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Health Care
5:13 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Why Isn't Kaiser Permanente Cheaper?

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 5:18 pm

Kaiser Permanente, the California-based managed care consortium, is touted as a model for saving money in the health care system. But they are not as inexpensive as they used to be.

The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Paralympic Cyclists Inspire Each Other, And A Documentary

Paralympic cyclists are featured in the upcoming documentary Unstoppables.
black train films

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 6:44 am

The opening ceremony of the London 2012 Summer Olympics are just over a month away — leading NPR and other media to cover the intense preparations for the games. That also means the Paralympic Games are on the way, as athletes with physical disabilities round into top form for the Aug. 29 opening day.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Concerns Remain Over 'Show Your Papers' Provision

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

President Obama and his Republican rival, Mitt Romney, responded to the high court's immigration ruling today. With immigration playing a high-profile role in the presidential election this year, both campaigns are heavily courting the Latino vote. President Obama offered up only a written statement which contained a mixed review.

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It's All Politics
4:26 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court's Arizona Ruling Could Aid Obama While Vexing Romney

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 8:47 am

The political impact of Monday's Supreme Court ruling that three of four provisions of Arizona's immigration enforcement law are unconstitutional — and that a fourth could eventually be found to be — certainly appeared, at first blush, to be a significant political win for President Obama.

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National Security
4:15 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

FBI Checking 100 Suspected Extremists In Military

The FBI is investigating more than 100 suspected Muslim extremists who are part of the U.S. military community, officials tell NPR. U.S. authorities have increased scrutiny since the 2009 shooting attack at Fort Hood, Texas, that left 13 dead. Maj. Nidal Hasan, charged with the killings, is shown here in an April 2010 court hearing.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

The FBI has conducted more than 100 investigations into suspected Islamic extremists within the military, NPR has learned. About a dozen of those cases are considered serious.

Officials define that as a case requiring a formal investigation to gather information against suspects who appear to have demonstrated a strong intent to attack military targets. This is the first time the figures have been publicly disclosed.

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Music Reviews
4:10 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

A Posthumous Masterpiece Adds To E.S.T.'s Legacy

E.S.T. was Esbjorn Svensson, Dan Berglund and Magnus Ostrom.
Jim Rakete

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 10:51 am

When the pianist Esbjorn Svensson died in a scuba accident in 2008, many fans of his group, the Swedish trio known as E.S.T., wondered if there might be some unreleased experiments lurking in a studio vault. There were. Just out is a disc called 301, which was recorded in 2008 during sessions for the group's final album.

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The Salt
3:19 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Cooking Regional Food When You're Far From The Fava Beans

Chef Mino Massi and his son Robi prep food from Puglia at the Washington, D.C. convention center.
Nancy Shute NPR

How do you showcase regional food when you're not in the region? Don't smuggle the salami in, that's for sure.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

80 Percent Of Lightning Strike Victims Are Male, But Why?

Lightning streaks across the sky in Tyler, Texas, as a powerful line of thunderstorms moved across the state in April.
Dr. Scott M. Lieberman AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 4:42 pm

This tweet from the National Weather Service caught our attention, today:

"More than 80% of lightning victims are male. Be a force of nature by knowing your risk, taking action and being an example"

Eighty percent seemed to us pretty significant, so we turned to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and asked, "Why?"

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Law
3:03 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Immigration Ruling May Close, Open Legal Windows

Arizona Republican Gov. Jan Brewer leaves a podium at the state Capitol in Phoenix after responding to President Obama's immigration speech on June 15. Brewer said the speech represented a "pre-emptive strike" aimed at what then was an upcoming Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's immigration law.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:16 am

The Supreme Court's decision to strike down much of Arizona's immigration law is being hailed as a victory by both sides in a fight likely to spawn many more legal battles.

Monday, the court struck down three of four provisions in the law but upheld, at least for the moment, a controversial measure allowing police to check the immigration status of anyone stopped or detained for any reason.

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Animals
2:26 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Reviving Extinct Species May Not Be Science Fiction

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

Wander through one of this country's fine museums of natural history and you'll see animals you'll never see in a zoo: the wooly mammoth, the dodo bird, animals extinct for centuries. But for Stewart Brand extinct doesn't mean gone forever. He's working on a new project, "Revive and Restore," to de-extinct animals we never thought we'd see alive.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
2:22 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Teenage Brain: Gateway To A 'Bright And Dark' World

Cover detail

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Meg Wolitzer is a novelist whose most recent works include The Uncoupling and a book for young readers, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman.

You know how people talk about so-called gateway drugs — drugs that lead to harder ones? I think some books can be considered gateway books, because reading them leads you to start reading other books that are similar but more intense. Lisa, Bright and Dark, John Neufeld's 1969 novel for young adults, is one of these.

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Environment
2:21 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Seeking The Micro, Scientists Find The Big Picture

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:22 pm

E.O Wilson and Sylvia Earle see the through very different lenses. Wilson started with his eyes to the ground, following ants as they lead him to the study of biodiversity and human nature. Earle dove into the Gulf of Mexico to focus on aquatic plants. That underwater view ultimately led her to study the relationship between degrading seas and life everywhere.

Environment
2:12 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Researchers Offer First-Hand View Of Climate Change

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:28 pm

As the climate changes, scientists are documenting measurable shifts in the natural world — from a tremendous loss in Arctic sea ice and an increase in extreme weather like drought, floods and heatwaves, to the migration of plants and animals to new latitudes.

Law
2:08 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Court Upholds 'Show Me Your Papers' In Arizona

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:23 pm

The Supreme Court has delivered a split ruling on Arizona's immigration law, striking down several key elements but upholding the "show me your papers" provision. The controversial provision allows local police to check the immigration status of people they stop in the normal course of their duties.

The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Vatican Hires Fox News Reporter To Advise Media Office

People gather on St. Peter's square to hear Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican Sunday. The Vatican has hired Fox News correspondent Greg Burke to advise its press office.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:54 pm

Seeking to modernize and widen its dealings with the media, the Vatican has hired Fox News Channel's Rome correspondent to advise its press office. The move will put journalist Greg Burke, who is also a member of Opus Dei, into a new role working with Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi.

For NPR's Newscast desk, Sylvia Poggioli reports from Rome:

"Greg Burke, 52, has been with Fox 10 years, and he'll be the first Vatican communications expert with experience outside the world of Catholic media.

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Law
1:38 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Ala. Juvenile Murderers Law Ruled Unconstitutional

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Remembrances
1:38 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Broadway's Richard Adler

Celebrated composer and lyricist Richard Adler has died at the age of 90.
Bob Gomel Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 9, 1990.

In 1955, The New York Times called Richard Adler and his writing partner, Jerry Ross, "Broadway's hottest young composers." Together, they wrote the music and lyrics for The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees, two shows that became known for the songs "Hey There," "Steam Heat," "Hernando's Hideaway" and "Whatever Lola Wants."

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Shots - Health Blog
1:14 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Dropping Legal Barriers Doesn't Guarantee Interstate Insurance Sales

Small business owner Brian Mayfield has been eager for less expensive health insurance options. It looks like he'll have to wait a little longer.
Jim Burress WABE, Atlanta

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 7:05 pm

Starting next week, any health insurer licensed in Georgia can sell policies it offers in other states to Georgians. That includes policies that don't meet minimum standards for coverage in Georgia.

They'll be OK for sale under a new state law that aims to increase competition and lower prices for health insurance in the state.

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Law
1:12 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Makes 3 Key Rulings

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

It's been a busy morning at the Supreme Court. Justices released several opinions, including a ruling on Arizona's controversial immigration law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. That law gave police broad powers to stop suspected illegal immigrants and demand their papers, but civil rights groups said it went too far and gave states too much authority over immigration policy.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Fukushima Markets Get First Local Seafood Since Nuclear Meltdown

Markets in the port city of Soma, in Fukushima, Japan, are once again selling local seafood. In this file photo, volunteers help clean up a Soma seafood restaurant damaged in last March's tsunami and earthquake.
Hiro Komae AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:11 pm

Seafood markets in Fukushima, Japan, are being stocked with locally caught products again, as officials seek to reintroduce local fare in the area that was hit by an earthquake, a tsunami and a nuclear meltdown in March of 2011.

The AP reports on the details:

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