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Opinion
5:06 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin: The Lingering Memory Of Dead Boys

Attorney Benjamin Crump speaks to the medial, holding cellphone records and a police report. He represents the family of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was was killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 7:05 pm

Tayari Jones has written for McSweeney's, The New York Times and The Believer. Her most recent book is Silver Sparrow.

Like many Americans, I have been glued to the television eager for details about the tragic murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. I am not sure what I hoped to discover, as each new piece of evidence is more disturbing than the last.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Southern Miss Revokes Scholarships Of Band Members For 'Green Card' Chant

The University of Southern Mississippi announced that it took disciplinary action against five of its pep band members today.

The five students were involved in one of the more controversial moments of the NCAA tournament, when they chanted "Where's your green card?" as Angel Rodriguez, a Latino player from Kansas State, took a free throw.

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It's All Politics
4:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Robert DeNiro's Racial First Lady Joke Was A No-No, White House Says

Actor Robert De Niro with his wife, Grace Hightower, in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 4, 2011.
Michael Tran Getty Images

Maybe Robert De Niro didn't know. Or maybe he forgot.

But when the superstar actor joked at a New York Obama campaign fundraiser Monday evening which Michelle Obama attended about the country not being ready for a white first lady, he got into dangerous territory for President Obama.

According to an Obama campaign pool report, De Niro deadpanned:

"Callista Gingrich. Karen Santorum. Ann Romney. Now do you really think our country is ready for a white first lady?"

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Sports
4:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

The Rodeo Circuit: Bucking Bulls And Broken Bones

Two bullfighters are tossed by the bull Jumpin Jack Flash during the 2006 Professional Bull Riders World Finals in Las Vegas.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:56 am

It's spring, and that means rodeo season is ramping up, especially in the American West. Some professional cowboys will soon be competing almost every night in bull riding, calf roping or steer wrestling.

But along with the trophy buckles and cash prizes, cowboys also bring home injuries — some of them severe. Some rodeo events are more dangerous, and less lucrative, than football and other contact sports.

An Unsteady Paycheck

The 2012 Houston Rodeo begins with a prayer and the national anthem, followed by the first event: calf roping.

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Middle East
4:43 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Turkey Resists Calls To Arm Syrian Rebels

Syrians living in Turkey and human-rights activists stage a protest on Feb. 4 outside the Syrian consulate in Istanbul to condemn the killings in Syria. Calls are growing louder for Turkey to intervene in the violence in neighboring Syria by helping the rebels and civilians there.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 6:15 pm

The rising civilian death toll in Syria is accompanied by mounting calls to arm the Syrian opposition. And Turkey, a NATO country that shares a long, rugged border with Syria, is often mentioned as a likely transit point.

Turkey has become increasingly critical of the Syrian regime, but Ankara is thus far reluctant to send significant arms across the border or use its large military to create a humanitarian corridor inside Syria.

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Music Reviews
4:37 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

'The Medium Is The Massage': A Kitchen Sink Of Sound

Artwork for The Medium Is the Massage.
Courtesy of the artist

Few 20th century thinkers predicted the 21st century era of social media and the Internet better than Marshall McLuhan. Beginning in the 1960s, the Toronto-based philosopher and scholar began to theorize about how television and radio were changing society, creating what he termed the "global village."

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Shots - Health Blog
4:36 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Is Anesthesia A Luxury During Colonoscopy?

No anesthesia here: A patient watches his colonoscopy as it happens at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital in New York.
Ted Thai Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Doctors often let patients decide how much sedation they'd like when they have a colonoscopy.

But whether you're put under by an anesthesiologist may depend a lot more on where you live and who gets paid than patient preference, according to a new study.

Big bucks are involved. It would cost an extra $8 billion a year if anesthesia services were used for all 20 million endoscopies and colonoscopies performed each year, because an anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist has to be paid, too.

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The Salt
3:54 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

There's More To Fixing Food Deserts Than Building Grocery Stores

Concepsion Alcantar-Alvarez looks through her cart in the check-out line at a Food 4 Less store in Chicago.
Tim Boyle Getty Images

There has been a lot of talk about what's wrong with food deserts. First lady Michelle Obama, for one, says far too many people can't access the fruits and vegetables they need to be healthy.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:44 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Medicaid And A Tale Of Two Miami Hospitals

Jackson Memorial Hospital is preparing for more Medicaid patients by renovating rooms. Jackson is the area's safety net hospital, which means it doesn't receive reimbursement for quite a bit of the care it gives.
Courtesy of Jackson Health System

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 1:32 pm

The federal health law's expansion of Medicaid will cover some 16 million more Americans in the government program for the poor, if that part of the law survives the legal challenge it faces in the Supreme Court beginning next week.

Florida is leading 25 other states in that challenge, but that hasn't stopped two of Miami's most prominent hospitals from preparing for the Medicaid expansion.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

The Candidates On Tuesday: All Eyes On Illinois, But Campaigning Nationwide

Jim Wilson of Buckingham, Va., who supports Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, walks past a bus during a Romney campaign stop Monday in Springfield, Ill.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 4:18 pm

As Illinois Republicans vote in their presidential primary, only one GOP candidate is expected to be in the state. Mitt Romney planned what he hopes to be a victory party Tuesday night in the Chicago suburb of Schaumburg.

Newt Gingrich is campaigning in Louisiana, which votes on Saturday.

Ron Paul is in California, which doesn't vote until June.

And Rick Santorum is in Pennsylvania, his home state, which votes on April 24.

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Law
3:11 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Without Parole, Juveniles Face Bleak Life In Prison

Charles Dutton is an award-winning actor. But as a juvenile, he wound up in prison for manslaughter and other crimes.
Andrew Kent Getty Images

We hear a lot about juvenile offenders when they commit a crime — and again, when they're sentenced to spend the rest of their lives in prison. But not much is known about what happens after the prison gates slam shut.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Clue In Old Photo Leads To New Search For Amelia Earhart's Plane

Amelia Earhart. She was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 12:21 pm

New analysis of a photo taken in 1937 has led investigators to think it might show a piece of the landing gear from aviator Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra plane, which disappeared in June that year somewhere in the South Pacific.

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The Two-Way
2:19 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Strong 7.9 Preliminary Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Mexico

Many people went into the streets after the strong quake rocked Mexico City.
Ronaldo Schemidt AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 4:25 pm

The USGS says an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.4 hit southwest Mexico today.

The United States Geological Survey says it was 6.2 miles deep and about 120 miles east of Acapulco.

We'll have more on this story as it develops.

Update at 3:54 p.m. ET. Back To Normal:

NPR's Jason Beaubien, reporting from the Zocalo area of Mexico City, says officials report no deaths and no major damage.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

NYTimes.com Cuts Free Articles To 10 Per Month, From 20

To "strengthen our ability to continue providing the world's most insightful and investigative reporting in journalism," The New York Times says that starting in April it will limit non-paying NYTimes.com visitors to 10 free articles per month, down from the current 20.

The Times adds that:

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The Picture Show
1:20 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Frida Kahlo's Private Stash Of Pictures

Frida Kahlo with Fulang Chang, circa 1938
Florence Arquin Courtesy of Artisphere

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:56 am

Our collective mental image of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo has been informed, mostly, by the vibrant self-portraits she painted over the years. But she also had a collection of photographs — about 6,500 of them — that were held privately for decades after her death at the request of her husband, Diego Rivera.

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The Impact of War
1:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Grading The Military's Mental Health Screenings

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 2:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. On Thursday, Staff Sergeant Robert Bales is expected to be charged with the murder of 16 civilians in Afghanistan. A court martial may eventually explain what happened and why, but there are other questions that arise from this atrocity that need answers.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Iditarod Winner Dallas Seavey Raced Against Family

2012 Iditarod winner Dallas Seavey's team climbs a hill. Seavy has guest riders on his sled for the ceremonial start of the race.
Frank Kovalchek Flickr

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:56 am

After more than a week of grueling days on a dog sled, Dallas Seavey won 2012's Iditarod, beating his father and grandfather in the process. The race took off from Willow, Alaska, on March 4, Seavey's 25th birthday. Nine days, 4 hours and 29 minutes later, he crossed the finish line in Nome as the youngest musher ever to win the race.

Seavey talks with NPR's Neal Conan about the extreme conditions of the Iditarod, from freezing dogs to sleepless nights, and what it means to be in a legacy racing family.

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Asia
1:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Unusually Public Scandal Plays Out In China

Bo Xilai, a Communist Party chief from Chongqing, was replaced by deputy prime minister Zhang Dejiang. A report released online details why he was pushed out. The scandal could the transition of power this fall when the executive committee of the Chinese Communist Party names seven new members.

Television
1:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Wendell Pierce On 'The Wire,' 'Treme' And Food

When actor Wendell Pierce returned to his native New Orleans to help rebuild after Hurricane Katrina, he noticed a lack of grocery stores selling fresh food. Now, Pierce is opening Sterling Farms — a chain of stores in the Ninth Ward that will sell food at affordable prices for low-income shoppers.

From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Letters: Homeless Hotspots And Earworms

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics including the controversy over homeless hotspots, why some songs get stuck in our heads, and sober advice for former Illinois Governor Blagojevich as he begins a long sentence in federal prison.

The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Peyton Manning Reaches Deal With Denver

Former Indianapolis quarterback Peyton Manning (left) talks with Tim Tebow of the Denver Broncos in 2010. Manning will be taking Tebow's job.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 3:34 pm

Update at 3:35 p.m. ET: It's official. Peyton Manning is indeed joining the Denver Broncos. He's talking with reporters in Denver right now.

Our Original Post:

"And they have a deal," The Denver Post reports. "An NFL source confirmed Tuesday morning the Broncos and quarterback Peyton Manning have agreed to a five-year, $96 million deal."

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin's Last Phone Call Contradicts Shooter's Claim, Attorney Says

George Zimmerman's statement to police about what 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was up to on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla., "is completely contradicted" by the boy's cellphone records, an attorney for Martin's family just said during a news conference in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

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News
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Rep Brown: Teen's Death "Not The Picture We Want"

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 6:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, later in our mom's conversation we will pick up on an important conversation we know many people are having around bullying. Last week, we heard from a 15-year-old who'd been bullied at school for years. Today, we'll hear how his mom felt about hearing about this in a documentary. That's coming up later in the program.

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News
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Was Trayvon Martin Targeted For Being Black?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, spring has sprung, so a good greeting for today is not just, Happy Spring, but also Happy New Year if you celebrate the Persian holiday, Norouz. We'll find out more about it in just a few minutes.

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Author Interviews
11:21 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Ahmed Rashid: Pakistan Lurches From Crisis To Crisis

Ahmed Rashid writes for The Washington Post, El Mundo and other international newspapers.
Courtesy of Ahmed Rashid

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 3:00 pm

In his latest book, Pakistan on the Brink, journalist Ahmed Rashid writes that he fears Pakistan "is on the brink of a meltdown."

"I fear almost anything could [send it over the edge]," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "There could be a major terrorist attack in the U.S. or Europe which is traced back to Pakistan. ... Then there's a very, very critical economic crisis in the country. There's no investment, no money, there's no energy — I live in Lahore. We've had no gas for six months."

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin Killing To Be Investigated By Florida Grand Jury

A grand jury in Florida is going to investigate the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, a case that has grabbed national attention because of concern that the young man may have been a victim of racial profiling and that local police haven't been aggressive enough about looking into his death.

Orlando's WESH-TV reports that:

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The Salt
10:56 am
Tue March 20, 2012

To Find Out About Food Allergies, First Use The Right Test

Nuts are a common source of true food allergy.
iStockphoto.com

A lot of people think they have food allergies, but they're likely wrong.

That's partly because it's easy to confuse common food-related problems like lactose intolerance or celiac disease with an allergy. But it's also because there are a lot of tests promoted for food allergies that don't measure up.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Tue March 20, 2012

'Justice Will Be Done,' Pentagon Official Says Of Afghan Massacre

Marine Corps Gen. John Allen during today's hearing.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 12:35 pm

The "horrific killings" this month of 16 Afghan civilians, allegedly by a U.S. Army staff sergeant, will be fully investigated and "justice will be done," a top Pentagon official just told the House Armed Services Committee.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:07 am
Tue March 20, 2012

States Struggle To Cover Uninsured With Pre-Existing Conditions

Newly covered Iowans with pre-existing conditions run up monthly costs of about $4,800.
iStockphoto.com

An actuary named Cecil Bykerk spends his days walking a fine line.

As the head of the board that runs Iowa's health plan for uninsured residents who can't qualify for private coverage, he wants to make sure that folks who need insurance can get it.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Tue March 20, 2012

On Persian New Year, Obama Tries To Pierce Iran's 'Electronic Curtain'

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 10:06 am

Saying that "because of the actions of the Iranian regime, an electronic curtain has fallen around Iran," President Obama today used his annual message marking Nowruz, the Persian New Year, to talk about Internet freedom.

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