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Space
3:05 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Earth Has Just One Moon, Right? Think Again

The last lunar eclipse of 2011 as seen from the San Gabriel Valley east of Los Angeles on Dec 10, 2011.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 2:01 pm

Everybody knows that there's just one moon orbiting the Earth. But a new study by an international team of astronomers concludes that everybody is dead wrong about that.

"At any time, there are one or two 1-meter diameter asteroids in orbit around the Earth," says Robert Jedicke, an astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii.

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It's All Politics
3:05 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Do Negative Ads Make A Difference? Political Scientists Say Not So Much

Future U.S. senator and presidential candidate John Kerry poses with crewmates during the Vietnam War in this file photo. An attack on his service by a group calling itself the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth is remembered as a turning point in the 2004 election. But political scientists say negative ads might not be that effective.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 2:01 pm

Pundits and commentators are forecasting that this fall's general election will see an avalanche of negative advertising. But as voters gird for the onslaught, political scientists are asking a different question: Will it matter?

When the Supreme Court lifted restrictions on private advertising in elections, superPACs supporting President Obama and the most likely Republican nominee, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, promised to unleash negative attacks on the other side.

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National Security
3:03 am
Tue April 3, 2012

A Prosecutor Makes The Case For Military Trials

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, the chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, graduated first in his class at West Point, studied as a Rhodes scholar, and attended Harvard Law School. Here he speaks during a press conference at the military facility on Jan 18. following a hearing against Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the main suspect in the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 2:01 pm

The chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is arguing a difficult case: that the commissions are not only fair, but can take pride of place alongside the civilian criminal justice system.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins is the chief prosecutor for the commissions, the courts at the naval base that try high-profile terrorism suspects.

He has been called Guantanamo's detox man largely because he has made it his mission to show that the military commissions system at Guantanamo is no longer a toxic version of victor's justice.

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Television
3:01 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Media Outlets Adapt To Growing Hispanic Audience

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 2:01 pm

Rapid growth in the U.S. Hispanic community has created another boom — in Hispanic media. In recent months, several major media players have announced plans to join the competition for the Hispanic television audience. There's a new Hispanic broadcast TV network coming, plus a host of new cable channels aimed at Latinos.

The numbers tell the story: According to the census, the U.S. Hispanic population jumped by more than 40 percent in the past decade. The nation's 50 million-plus Hispanics now make up 16 percent of the TV-viewing public.

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All Tech Considered
3:00 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Who Has The Right To Our Facebook Accounts Once We Die?

At least two states are considering laws to require social networking sites to grant loved ones access to the accounts of family members who have died.
Gunay Mutlu iStockphoto.com

When Loren Williams died in a motorcycle crash in 2005, his mother used his Facebook password to read posts on his wall.

"These were postings from personal friends that [said] he meant a lot to them in their lives, and it was very comforting," Karen Williams told KGW television in Portland, Ore. "There were pictures that I had never seen before of his life and just evidence of the wonderful relationships that he had established."

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The Two-Way
7:33 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

PHOTO: The First Woman To Enter The Boston Marathon

Kathrine Switzer of Syracuse found herself about to be thrown out of the normally all-male Boston Marathon when a husky companion, Thomas Miller of Syracuse, threw a block that tossed a race official out of the running instead.
AP

We had never read about Kathrine Switzer, but then we saw this astonishing picture cross our social streams:

That's Switzer, of Syracuse, being pushed off the Boston Marathon course by Jock Semple, one of the race organizers. The year was 1967 and as Switzer tells it, Semple jumped off the media truck and began yelling at her.

"Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers," she says he told her.

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Poetry
7:25 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Muses And Metaphor 2012

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 11:40 am

Poetry and social media join forces in April, as Tell Me More celebrates National Poetry Month with the Muses and Metaphor series. We'll feature poems exchanged via Twitter by NPR fans — always in 140 characters or fewer. Tweet your poem using the hashtag: #TMMPoetry.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:21 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

As Health Care Giants Merge, Pharmacies Aren't Happy

It remains to be seen whether bigger will actually be better.
GMVozd iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 7:57 pm

Two of the biggest behind-the-scenes players in the health care industry have become one.

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The Two-Way
6:11 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

American Senior Citizens Still Owe $36 Billion In Student Loans

Americans 60 years and older are still paying off $36 billion in student debt. That's according to research from Federal Bank of New York, the Washington Post parses today.

The story is worth a read, but here is the gist:

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Around the Nation
5:59 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

7 Dead After Shooting Rampage At Calif. University

Audie Cornish speaks with Richard Gonzales, about Monday's shooting rampage at a university in Oakland. Seven people were killed and three others wounded when a gunman opened fire.

It's All Politics
5:35 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Obama Administration Officials Tripped Up By Clown, Comedian, Mindreader

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 11:03 am

A mind reader, a clown and a comedian walk into a bar.

Actually, we don't know about a bar. But we do know they walked into a conference of federal workers held outside Las Vegas in October 2010.

And though it sounds like the start of a joke, it isn't. Someone at the General Services Administration, the federal agency charged with managing government property, actually approved using taxpayer money to pay the three to appear at the meeting.

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It's All Politics
5:26 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

As A Politician, Romney's Long Had Trouble Talking Cars

Mitt Romney has had issues in this campaign with cars.

You may remember his "two Cadillacs" comment in February, immediately characterized as a gaffe for a candidate who has often seemed to struggle with how to address his wealth on the trail.

"I like the fact that most of the cars I see are Detroit-made automobiles," said Romney in Michigan. "I drive a Mustang and a Chevy pickup truck. Ann [his wife] drives a couple of Cadillacs, actually."

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Around the Nation
5:10 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

America's First Celebrity Robot Is Staging A Comeback

Musician Lois Kendall plays the bass while the robot Elektro "conducts" on stage as part of a Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing demonstration at the 1939 World's Fair in New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 7:32 pm

Before IBM's Watson and Deep Blue, there was another celebrity robot: Elektro.

The first robot introduced to Americans, Elektro was the 7-foot-tall man who greeted millions of visitors who streamed through the gates of the 1939 World's Fair. He even appeared on film, in The Middleton Family at the New York World's Fair.

The robot was built as a showpiece for the manufacturer Westinghouse, which made clothing irons and ovens in Mansfield, Ohio, at the time.

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The Two-Way
5:08 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

George Zimmerman's Attorney: 'This Is Not A Race Issue'

George Zimmerman, in a 2005 mug shot provided by the Orange County (Fla.) jail, via The Miami Herald.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:38 pm

The attorney of the man accused of shooting 17-year-old Trayvon Martin says "this is not a race issue."

During an interview with Tell Me More's Michel Martin (no relation), attorney Craig Sonner said his client George Zimmerman had black friends, who he's talked to and they have vouched for him.

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Music Interviews
4:58 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Dr. John: A Rock Legend Gets Personal

Dr. John's newest album, Locked Down, comes out Tuesday.
Michael Wilson

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 12:01 am

In his 1995 autobiography, Under a Hoodoo Moon, Dr. John writes about his tumultuous music career, a decades-long heroin addiction and the time he spent in prison on a drug-possession charge. The book is candid in a way that most of his music is not — until now. On his new album, Locked Down, Dr. John takes a more personal approach.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:29 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Most Americans Are Getting Enough Vitamins, CDC Says

Just because we're eating our vitamins doesn't mean our diets are as healthful as they should be.
gerenme iStockphoto.com

Here's some good news about Americans' diets: Most of us are getting sufficient amounts of key vitamins and minerals. That's the finding of a nutrition report just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Vitamins A and D, folate, iron and iodine are just a few of the nutrients assessed in the nationwide survey, which uses data collected between 1999 and 2006. Overall, less than 10 percent of the population appeared deficient in each nutrient.

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Environment
4:15 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Seafloor Becomes Next Frontier For Gold Diggers

A robotic arm breaks off a chunk of mineral-rich rock deep underwater. Nautilus Minerals of Australia hopes to develop and expand undersea mining by extracting copper, gold, silver and zinc from the seafloor.
Nautilus Minerals

Filmmaker James Cameron recently reminded us of the wonders of the sea by diving solo in a submarine to the deepest spot in the ocean. Next year, if all goes as planned, a rather different expedition will take place 1,000 miles south of that dive: An Australian company will start mining for copper, gold, silver and zinc on the seafloor off the shore of Papua New Guinea.

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It's All Politics
4:07 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Mitt Who? State Issues, Governor Eclipse Presidential Politics In Wisconsin

Mitt Romney has campaigned in the shadow of embattled Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who faces a recall vote in June. Here, Romney speaks with Walker supporters at a phone bank during a campaign stop in Fitchburg, Wis., on Saturday.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 2:25 pm

Voters in Wisconsin's GOP primary Tuesday are poised to help former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney wrap up his dogged, well-financed quest for the Republican presidential nomination.

But the winner-take-all primary and Romney's drawn-out battle with former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum have been overshadowed by the campaign to recall GOP Gov. Scott Walker, whose anti-union efforts since his 2010 election have cleaved the Badger State.

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It's All Politics
4:06 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

'Mad Men' George Romney Swipe Incites Angry Tweet From Grandson Tagg

Mitt Romney with campaign poster for his father, George, in Spartanburg, SC, January 2012.
Charles Dharapak AP

Was Mad Men weighing in on Election 2012 from the year 1966?

That's the question many are asking today after last night's episode of the Emmy Award-winning advertising-world drama on AMC.

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The Two-Way
3:32 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

At Least One Dead In Shooting At Christian University In Oakland

An Oakland police officer walks outside of Oikos University in Oakland, Calif., Monday.
Noah Berger AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 9:22 pm

A gunman opened fire inside a Christian university in Oakland. Several people were shot and multiple people were dead at the Oikos University campus.

The Oakland Police Department tweeted that a "possible suspect" was in custody so there was "no imminent public safety threat."

Update at 9:19 p.m. Police Identify Suspect:

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Music Interviews
3:28 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Hello? Is This The Country Album You're Looking For?

"If I had to have another title for this record besides Tuskegee," Lionel Richie says, "it would be called All the Songs That They Told Me Would Ruin My Career."
Alan Silfen UMG Nashville

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

You know who's got a country album out right now? Lionel Richie. The same Lionel Richie who started his career in the funk band The Commodores — that's right, the group that made "Brick House."

But on his new album, titled Tuskegee, country artists from Tim McGraw to Darius Rucker re-imagine the ballads that made Richie famous. These are the songs that have become slow-dance staples at proms and weddings everywhere.

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Africa
3:12 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Once-Thriving Egyptian Port Suffers After Soccer Riot

Egyptian soccer fans clash with riot police following a match between the hometown Al-Masry team and Cairo's Al-Ahly at the soccer stadium in Port Said, Egypt, on Feb. 1.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

The Egyptian city of Port Said is the northern gateway to one of the world's key shipping lanes, the Suez Canal connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea. With its ornate buildings and clean streets, the sprawling city has one of the highest standards of living in Egypt.

But this year, Port Said has become known for something more sinister: It was the site of Egypt's deadliest soccer riot.

Many of the city's officials and residents say the tragedy has destroyed Port Said's reputation and left them in financial trouble.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

ABC News: Enhanced Video Shows Injury To Zimmerman's Head

From the enhanced version of the video, showing what may be a gash on George Zimmerman's head.
ABC News

Reporting that it has had the video "clarified" by a forensics company, ABC News is now saying that a police surveillance recording of George Zimmerman "shows the neighborhood watch captain with an injury to the back of his head."

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The Salt
2:19 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

French Muslims Ease Cultural Tensions With French-Halal Food

A butcher shop in Paris, which prominently advertises that it sells halal meat.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 2:21 pm

On a recent evening, Les Enfants Terribles, a Paris restaurant that serves French cuisine cooked with halal meat, was brimming with customers.

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Middle East
2:05 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Syrian Exiles Seek To Spread Word On Internet Radio

Protests in Syria have carried on despite the crackdown by the government's security forces. New Start Radio, an Internet radio station, has reported on events by speaking to citizen journalists around the country. Here, protesters take part in a March 2 demonstration in northern Syria.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

We can't tell you where Hussam and Rania live, but we can tell you they used to live in Syria's capital, Damascus.

Hussam was a creative director at a small marketing company he founded with a friend. Rania was the morning host for a radio station owned by the cousin of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Then came the protests all around Syria. Then came the phone call.

"The radio station called me, at home, and they said, 'Rania we have to say the truth,' " Rania says.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:59 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Just A Dirty Diaper, Or Worse? Smelly Urine May Mean Infection

Stinky urine in a feverish child should be a red flag for doctors.
Swilmor iStockphoto.com

If you've spent any time around very young children, you know they can sometimes be pretty stinky. But particularly pungent urine in a child who is fussy or feverish could be a sign of infection.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Annan: Syria Agrees To Pull Troops From Cities By April 10

Bashar Ja'afari, Syria's Ambassador to the United Nations, points to reporters asking questions as he speaks to the media outside Security Council chambers on Monday.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 2:00 pm

Syria will abide by the international peace plan and remove its troops from cities by April 10, Kofi Annan, the U.N. envoy to the country, told the Security Council.

The AP reports:

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Author Interviews
1:55 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

From 'App' To 'Tea': English Examined In '100 Words'

"Tea" (a social word from the 17th century) is one of the words David Crystal examines in his book The Story of English In 100 Words.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 3:26 pm

Linguist David Crystal describes English as a "vacuum cleaner of a language." Speakers merrily swipe some words from other languages, adopt others because they're cool or sound classy, and simply make up other terms.

In his new book, he tells The Story of English in 100 Words, using a collection of words — classic ones like "tea" and new words like "app" — that explain how the the English language has evolved.

Crystal thinks every word has a story to tell, even the ones as commonplace as "and."

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Clang! Three Reasons Why Many Shots May Miss Tonight

Anthony Davis of Kentucky during Saturday's victory over Louisville.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 2:52 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition'

Two "powerhouse" programs — Kansas and Kentucky.

Rosters full of potential NBA stars.

All the hype you would expect from an NCAA men's basketball championship.

But, alas, don't be surprised if there aren't as many "silky smooth jumpers" and other great shots as you might expect during tonight's big game, NPR's Mike Pesca reports.

Three things are working against the teams:

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Middle East
1:00 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Next Step In Syria: Peaceful Or Armed Intervention?

At least 70 countries, including the U.S., pledged millions of dollars in aid to the Syrian opposition. U.N.-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan has set a deadline of April 10 for compliance with the U.N. peace plan. Some analysts believe it's too late for peaceful negotiations.

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