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Energy
5:53 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Pro-Pipeline Canada To Americans: Butt Out, Eh?

OurDecision.ca campaign, which calls on Canadians to write to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver asking him to ban foreigners and "their local puppet groups" from appearing before ongoing public hearings for a new pipeline project. " href="/post/pro-pipeline-canada-americans-butt-out-eh" class="noexit lightbox">
A screen shot from Ethical Oil's OurDecision.ca campaign, which calls on Canadians to write to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver asking him to ban foreigners and "their local puppet groups" from appearing before ongoing public hearings for a new pipeline project.
OurDecision.ca

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:28 pm

Yet another foreign government has accused Americans of meddling in its internal affairs. It says U.S. donors are bankrolling local political activists, and it may be time for a crackdown on the political influence of outsiders.

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Around the Nation
5:48 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Heavy Lobbying Before Keystone Oil Pipeline Decision

The Syncrude tar sands mine north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, is seen in November. Alberta's tar sands would supply the oil for the prospective Keystone XL pipeline.
Todd Korol Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

The oil industry and environmentalists are fighting over the Keystone XL pipeline, and in this election year, President Obama is caught in the middle.

The industry says the pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast, would create jobs. Environmentalists worry it will lead to more pollution. Obama has until next month to make a decision, and that has both sides lobbying heavily.

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The Two-Way
5:38 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

With New Platform, Putin Presents Himself As A Reformer

Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin speaks during a Government Presidium meeting in Moscow on Jan. 12.
Yana Lapikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 5:42 pm

Russia's Vladimir Putin took to the Internet to present the platform he would persue should he be elected president on March 4.

It was a bold platform, considering that it would walk back policies he helped institute. As The Telegraph puts it, it was Putin remaking himself into a "liberal reformer."

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Afghanistan
5:26 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Viral Images, The Military's Recurring Nightmare

A still frame taken from a YouTube video purportedly shows Marines who desecrated three dead men thought to be members of the Taliban in Afghanistan.
YouTube

The U.S. military says it's investigating a video that appears to show Marines desecrating the corpses of Taliban fighters killed in Afghanistan. Regardless of those findings, the outrage in the Islamic world is likely to be severe, as with other disturbing images that have surfaced during U.S. wars in Muslim countries over the past decade.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:19 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

UConn Claims Resveratrol Researcher Falsified Work

The already shaky case for the anti-aging powers of resveratrol, a substance in red wine, is looking a little shakier.

After a three-year investigation, the University of Connecticut Health Center has told 11 scientific journals that studies they published by resveratrol researcher Dipak K. Das may not be trustworthy.

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The Salt
5:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Could A Soda Tax Prevent 2,600 Deaths Per Year?

Researchers say that if the price of soda gets higher, people will drink less of it, which will lead to fewer deaths.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 2:33 pm

A new study in the journal Health Affairs estimates that a penny-per-ounce tax on soft drinks and other sugary beverages could prevent about 240,000 cases of diabetes per year, and 8,000 strokes and 26,000 premature deaths over a decade (or 2,600 per year).

Yes, death by soda.

So the analysis got me thinking: Our behavior is hard to predict, right? I know mine is.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

How Do Land Birds End Up In A Tiger Shark's Belly?

Scientists are facing a riddle. For two years, researchers at Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama have been studying the diets of Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and they found that the sharks not only eat sea creatures, but also make a habit of eating land birds. Yep that's right woodpeckers, catbirds, kingbirds and swallows have all been found in their bellies.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:11 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Biggest Bucks In Health Care Are Spent On A Very Few

A relatively small number of patients account for some of the biggest spending on health care.
Ricardo Reitmeyer iStockphoto.com

So you know how on Monday the federal government reported that the $2.6 trillion the nation spent on health care in 2010 translated into just over $8,400 per person?

Well, a different study just released by a separate federal agency shows that second number doesn't actually mean very much.

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The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Judge Declares Natalee Holloway Legally Dead

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:34 pm

An Alabama judge signed an order that declares Natalee Holloway, the teenager who went missing in Aruba while on a high school graduation trip, legally dead. Holloway was last seen in 2005.

The AP reports:

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It's All Politics
3:31 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Bill Janklow's Death Gives South Dakota Tribal Leader Chance To Vent

When someone dies, the eulogies roll in, the higher the stature of the departed, the more stately the praise.

And that's certainly somewhat true for Bill Janklow, South Dakota's former congressman and governor who died Thursday from his brain cancer.

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Latin America
3:19 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Ordinary Life Resurrected, Slowly, In Haiti

A storefront in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is brightly painted with a message welcoming President Michel Martelly into power. Two years after a devastating earthquake destroyed much of the Haitian capital, progress is palpable.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:28 pm

In Port-au-Prince, a radio blares from speakers in front of a guy selling pirated CDs on Delmas, a main street in the Haitian capital. Women sitting along the side of the road hawk everything from vegetables to cigarettes to pharmaceuticals. Overloaded tap-taps, the pickup trucks that serve as the main form of public transportation here, chug up the hill.

The scene is one that's remarkable for being unremarkable: Though it occurred this week, it could just as easily have been Port-au-Prince two years ago, before a massive earthquake destroyed much of the capital.

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Foxconn Resolves Dispute With Workers Who Threatened Suicide

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 4:43 pm

Earlier this month, a group Chinese workers at Foxconn spent two days on the roof of one of the companies factories in central China. As The Telegraph reported, the workers were threatening to commit suicide to protest their working conditions.

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The Salt
3:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Why X-Rayed Food Isn't Radioactive, And Other Puzzles

Irradiation is most often used to kill insects, parasites, or bacteria in or on spices, which are typically dried outdoors in before being shipped.
Lui Kit Wong MCT /Landov

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 4:23 pm

Earlier this week, we were surprised to learn that food manufacturers increasingly X-ray foods to screen for foreign objects that can break a tooth. That sounds like a good idea.

But the notion of X-rayed food also sparked a lively debate in The Salt's comments section on whether this poses a health threat. After all, we do know that some X-rays can damage DNA in the human body. So what does radiation mean for food?

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The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Court-Martial Recommended For Bradley Manning In WikiLeaks Case

Army Pvt. Bradley Manning last month.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:28 pm

An investigating officer has recommended that Army private Bradley Manning face court-martial on multiple criminal charges related to the downloading of nearly 1 million war logs and secret diplomatic cables. Manning is accused of taking the files and them passing them on to WikiLeaks.

If he does face a court martial and is convicted, he could be sentenced to life in prison.

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Movie Reviews
3:02 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

An 'Iron Lady' Fully Inhabited By Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep (center) stars as Margaret Thatcher in Phyllida Lloyd's biopic about the former prime minister of the United Kingdom.
The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 12:12 pm

I admit I was biased against the Margaret Thatcher biopic The Iron Lady. Not, you understand, against Thatcher and her Tory politics. Against Meryl Streep and her accents. Which are great, no doubt. But I went in resolved not to fall for her pyrotechnics yet again. I wanted realism.

Well, it didn't take long to realize that I was watching not only one of the greatest impersonations I'd ever seen — but one that was also emotionally real.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Walton Discusses Aftermath Of Haiti Quake

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a snapshot of public health in Haiti two years after the earthquake.

I'm joined by Dr. David Walton of the non-profit group Partners in Health. He's directing the construction of a new hospital about 30 miles north of Port-au-Prince in Mirebalais.

Dr. Walton, welcome to the program.

DR. DAVID WALTON: Thank so much for having me.

BLOCK: Sounds like a big hospital that you're in the process of building; 320 beds, 180,000 square feet. What are your hopes for that hospital?

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Presidential Race
3:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Obama Takes Aim At Republican Comments

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Aides say President Obama won't get deeply involved in the political campaign until Republicans settle on a nominee, but Mr. Obama has already been busy fundraising. Today, his campaign announced that it raised $130 million last year. And as NPR's Scott Horsley reports, even when the president is conducting his official duties, it's easy to sense the political subtext.

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Presidential Race
3:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Amid Recent Criticism, Romney Pushes Back

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Remembrances
3:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Former S.D. Gov., U.S. Rep. William Janklow Dies

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

William Janklow, a former Republican governor and congressman from South Dakota, died today at a Sioux Falls hospice center. He was 72 years old. Janklow announced in November he had an inoperable brain tumor.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Alaska: Nome Still Waits For Fuel, Big Shovels Headed To Cordova

A member of the Alaska National Guard clearing a walkway in Cordova earlier this week.
Spc. Balinda O'Neal, Alaska National Guard AP

Originally published on Mon January 16, 2012 8:55 am

  • Tony Gorman, reporting from Valdez

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Environment
2:32 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

To Slow Climate Change, Cut Down On Soot, Ozone

An Indian street dweller prepares food on the streets of Kolkata. A growing number of scientists say that reducing black carbon — mostly soot from burning wood, charcoal and dung — would have an immediate and powerful impact on climate.
Deshakalyan Chowdhury AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Politically, climate change is off this year's campaign agenda. Jobs, the economy and social issues are front and center.

But scientists are working as hard as ever to figure out how much the Earth is warming and what to do about it. Some now say it's time for a new strategy, one that gets faster results.

Talk to Durwood Zaelke, for example. Zaelke is a grizzled veteran of the climate wars: He was in Kyoto in 1997 when the world's nations drafted a treaty promising to curb warming, and he has watched that promise fizzle while the planet's temperature continues to rise.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Bill Janklow, Former U.S. Rep and S.D. Gov., Has Died

Bill Janklow, an institution in South Dakota politics who was known for his brashness and pushing things to completion, has died at age 72.

The AP has the basics:

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

After Monitor Quits, Arab League Defends Its Syrian Peace-Keeping Mission

In this frame grab from an amatuer video posted on YouTube, members of the Arab League monitor the recent violence in Syria.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 1:09 pm

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It's All Politics
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

U.S. Chamber President Criticizes GOP's 'Intramural' Battle Over Bain

U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Tom Donohue at a press conference Thursday in Washington.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 2:57 pm

The "Battle Over Bain" has become a hot topic at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a key player in politics.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Tom Donohue says he is "disappointed" that some GOP presidential candidates are attacking front-runner and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney for his work at Bain Capital in the 1990s.

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Law
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Abortion Rights Advocates, Opponents' Tactics Evolve

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. It's now almost four decades since the Supreme Court's famous and controversial ruling that legalized abortion. In recent years, opponents have stepped up efforts to challenge Roe v. Wade in Congress and state legislatures, in court and at the ballot box, last year in particular.

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Latin America
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

USAID's Shaw Assesses Pace Of Haiti Recovery

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Firing While On Duty: When Police Use Deadly Force

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. A police officer draws a weapon and fires. We see that on TV dramas every night. But what actually happens afterwards? Do investigators check the flight of every bullet? What kind of questions do officers face, and what kind of sanctions if they messed up?

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Afghanistan
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Experts Fear Fallout From Afghanistan Video

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:53 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The Marine Corps has identified at least two of the four Marines in a video that surfaced last night as Marines based at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. The video shows four U.S. Marines in Afghanistan in full combat gear, standing over the corpses of three men, laughing and urinating on the bodies. The audio is difficult to understand.

(SOUNDBITE OF YOUTUBE VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Here's the tough guy (unintelligible).

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: I think so (unintelligible).

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Shots - Health Blog
12:48 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Researchers Say 3 Embryos Is Too Many For IVF

Less may be more when it comes to the number of embryos for in vitro fertilization.
iStockphoto.com

Only last week we reported on the explosion in the number of twins in this country, largely a result of women turning to fertility treatments.

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Politics
12:17 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Political Battle Brewing Over New Voter ID Laws

Verdell Winder of Washington holds up his driver's license showing his "I Voted" sticker after voting on Election Day on Nov. 4, 2008.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 9:58 pm

As the presidential campaign kicks into high gear, a fight is brewing over stricter voting laws that could affect turnout and influence general election results in battleground states.

New laws in several states will require millions of voters to show photo identification when they cast ballots this year, the result of a nationwide push mostly by Republicans who claim the measures will prevent election fraud. Democrats and voting rights activists oppose the laws, arguing that they are unnecessary because voter fraud is rare.

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