From NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
7:22 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Today's Primaries: Gingrich's Swan Song Or Reason To Remain?

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich earlier this month in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Nothing about what happens during today's Republican presidential primaries in five states is expected to change the fact that Mitt Romney is the presumptive/expected/presumed/inevitable (pick your favorite word) nominee.

Polls are open in Connecticut, Delaware, New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. There are 209 convention delegates at stake and Romney could pull off a five-state sweep.

But β€” and there's always a but β€” there's this:

Read more
Business
5:20 am
Tue April 24, 2012

GM To Add 600 Chinese Dealerships In 2012

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 8:29 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

General Motors is making a bigger effort in what's become the world's biggest car market. At the Beijing Auto Show this week, GM said it plans to open 600 new dealerships in China this year. GM is trying to grow Chinese sales while they still can.

NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from Shanghai.

Read more
Business
5:18 am
Tue April 24, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:34 am

Victoria Beckham has teamed up with Range Rover to produce a special edition Evoque luxury SUV. The former Spice Girl, married to soccer star David Beckham, has designed fashion lines before, but says this is her first foray into automobiles.

Business
5:18 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Bribery Accusations Hurt Wal-Mart's Stock Price

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:41 am

Wal-Mart could face significant legal liability following a report accusing the company of systematic bribery in Mexico. A report in The New York Times claims Wal-Mart officials in Mexico paid more than $20 million in bribes to help the company open more stores there. The story also says top Wal-Mart executives in the U.S. looked the other way. The company's stock price fell nearly 5 percent Monday.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:30 am

Weeks ahead of its initial public offering, Facebook released its first quarter profits Monday, and they are down 12 percent from a year ago. At the same time, company expenses have nearly doubled. Facebook attributes some of that to market expansion, which requires more employees and infrastructure.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Former Icelandic Leader Tried On Economic Collapse

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's turn now to the first political leader to be put on trial for his role in the global banking crisis. Yesterday, a special court in Iceland found that country's former prime minister guilty of essentially mishandling the banking bubble that led to Iceland's financial collapse.

Michael Stothard has been covering this trial for The Financial Times. He joined us to talk more about it. Good morning.

MICHAEL STOTHARD: Good morning.

Read more
Election 2012
4:48 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Obama Tries To Charm Youth Vote With College Stops

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:18 pm

President Obama sets off on a two-day tour of college campuses Tuesday to tout a plan to keep student loans more affordable.

The trip is billed as official business, but it has a political flavor. Stops include: North Carolina, where Democrats hold their national convention this summer; Colorado, where Obama accepted his party's nomination four years ago; and Iowa, where his White House campaign was launched in 2008.

All three states are expected to be hard-fought battlegrounds in November.

Read more
National Security
3:36 am
Tue April 24, 2012

U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

The Marines' most senior officers β€” including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) β€” are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan.
Bay Ismoyo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

There's some soul-searching going on in the military these days.

The latest scandal to hit U.S. troops fighting in Afghanistan surfaced last week when The Los Angeles Times published photographs showing smiling American soldiers holding up body parts of a Taliban suicide bomber.

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the latest incident during a trip to Brussels.

"That behavior that was depicted in those photos absolutely violates both our regulations and, more importantly, our core values," he said last week after a NATO meeting.

Read more
National Security
3:34 am
Tue April 24, 2012

'Convention' Of Convicted Terrorists At N.Y. Trial

Bosnian-born Adis Medunjanin is accused of playing a role in the 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways. This photo of Medunjanin was provided by the U.S. attorney's office in Brooklyn, N.Y.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:27 am

There have been hundreds of terrorism trials in the U.S. since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but the case unfolding in Brooklyn, N.Y., is different. While its focus is on defendant Adis Medunjanin and the role he allegedly played in a 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways, the trial itself breaks new ground. It marks the first time the public is hearing in open court about real al-Qaida plots from the people the terrorist group actually dispatched to carry them out.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:33 am
Tue April 24, 2012

New Rule Cracks Down On Bear Poaching In New York

The body parts of black bears are harvested all around the world, for use in Asian cooking and medicine. A new rule in New York aims to more closely monitor hunters who trade in body parts.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

A new rule that took effect this year in New York state is designed to stop the illegal sale of black bear parts for use in Asian medicine and cooking. While the sale of parts is still allowed, hunters will now have to document that they were taken legally.

The tiny village of Keene, N.Y., in the Adirondack Mountains is part of a trade network that supplies Asian apothecaries and restaurants from New York City to Seoul, South Korea.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:32 am
Tue April 24, 2012

If The Health Care Overhaul Goes Down, Could Medicare Follow?

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

A growing number of health experts are warning of potential collateral damage if the Supreme Court strikes down the entire 2010 Affordable Care Act: potential chaos in the Medicare program.

Read more
Environment
3:31 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Melt Or Grow? Fate Of Himalayan Glaciers Unknown

In this undated picture, Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,029 feet, stands behind the Khumbu Glacier, one of the longest glaciers in the world. Nepal has more than 2,300 glacial lakes, and experts say at least 20 are in danger of bursting.
Subel Bhandari AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:14 am

The Himalayas are sometimes called the world's "third pole" because they are covered with thousands of glaciers. Water from those glaciers helps feed some of the world's most important rivers, including the Ganges and the Indus. And as those glaciers melt, they will contribute to rising sea levels.

So a lot is at stake in understanding these glaciers and how they will respond in a warming world. Researchers writing in the latest issue of Science magazine make it clear they are still struggling at that task.

Read more
Election 2012
3:30 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Romney Keeps Hand Hidden On Running Mate Pick

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, joined by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks to reporters during a news conference in Aston, Pa., on Monday. Rubio is frequently mentioned as a potential running mate for Romney.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:19 pm

Ahead of Pennsylvania's primary Tuesday, the likely Republican presidential nominee has been campaigning in the state with a man at the center of running-mate speculation β€” Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. But Mitt Romney hasn't said much about whom he might name as his vice presidential choice.

Romney has said he appointed a longtime aide to handle the process and that he hasn't yet discussed making a list of potential candidates. But just about everyone else in politics is discussing it. And the men at the top of that list are asked about it a lot.

Read more
Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
3:29 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Preparing For A Future That Includes Aging Parents

Natasha Shamone-Gilmore (right) attends church with her husband, Curtis Gilmore (center), and her father, Franklin Brunson, 81. Shamone-Gilmore moved Brunson into her Capitol Heights, Md., home after he developed dementia.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:52 am

Planning a wedding is exciting.

Mapping out a vacation is fun.

Figuring how to afford care for your confused, elderly father? That one may never cross your mind β€” at least, not until you need more money to care for him.

"Never thought about it," Natasha Shamone-Gilmore, 58, says about her younger self. "Never ever."

She thinks about it a lot these days. Shamone-Gilmore, a computer trainer in Maryland, now shares a modest home with her husband, 24-year-old son and 81-year-old father.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:56 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Mona Eltahawy Explains Why Women Are Hated In The Middle East

Mona Eltahawy (center), a prominent Egyptian-born, U.S.-based columnist, and Egyptian activist Samira Ibrahim (left) march in downtown Cairo to mark International Women's Day in March.
Maya Alleruzzo AP

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:58 am

We don't usually point out opinion pieces on this blog. But Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-born and U.S.-based journalist, is making a statement worth noting. She wrote a cover essay titled "Why Do They Hate Us?" for this month's Foreign Policy.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:09 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Prosecutor Accuses Clemens Of 'Deceit,' 'Dishonesty'

Former all-star baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves the U.S. District Court on Monday after the first day of his perjury and obstruction trial in Washington, D.C.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:49 am

The retrial of baseball great Roger Clemens began in earnest Monday after a week of jury selection. Clemens is charged with lying in 2008 to a congressional committee when he denied ever using steroids or human growth hormone.

He will be judged by a jury of 10 women and 6 men β€” 12 jurors and 4 alternates β€” who will decide whether Clemens lied under oath about using the drugs when he testified before a congressional committee investigating the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:42 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Jennifer Hudson Testifies During Ex-Brother-In-Law's Murder Trial

In this courtroom sketch, singer and actress Jennifer Hudson testifies on Monday in Chicago at the murder trial of William Balfour.
Tom Gianni AP

The Oscar-and Grammy Award-winning artist Jennifer Hudson took the stand today during the trial of the man accused of killing her mother, brother and seven-year-old nephew.

Reporting from Chicago, NPR's Cheryl Corley filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Hudson began crying when a prosecutor asked her about the last time she saw her family. She answered it was the Sunday before their slaying in October of 2008. The man accused of killing them, William Balfour, was Hudson's brother-in-law at the time.

Read more
Business
5:39 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Bankrupt American Airlines Spars With Unions

American Airlines and American Eagle employees protest Monday in New York City against American's plans to cut jobs and labor costs while under bankruptcy court protection. American is seeking permission to break up union contracts and cut expenses, but the unions oppose those plans and support a potential takeover bid by US Airways.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:24 pm

With US Airways breathing down its neck, making nice with its unions as well as its creditors, American Airlines came to New York City on Monday to ask a federal bankruptcy judge for relief. Mostly, American wants relief from its unions β€” 13,000 jobs would be eliminated under its reorganization proposal. American has been hemorrhaging money for years and wants to lower its costs to compete.

Read more
The Salt
5:37 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

The California Taco Trail: 'How Mexican Food Conquered America'

Cielito Lindo's famous taquitos are made fresh to order at the well-known taco stand in downtown Los Angeles.
Carolina Miranda NPR

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:23 am

For 50 years, the taco has been a staple of American life. It's in school lunches and Michelin-star restaurants. It even helped launch the food truck craze. So how did the taco come to loom so large in American bellies?

Read more
Middle East
5:24 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

West Bank Outpost Ignites Political Battle

Israelis who support Jewish settlements in the West Bank rally against a demolition order for the outpost of Ulpana on Sunday. Israeli courts have ordered the outpost torn down, but Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government is looking to keep it intact.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 10:05 am

Israel's highest court has already ruled that the Jewish settler outpost of Ulpana in the West Bank was built on privately owned Palestinian land.

And Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government had pledged to meet a May 1 deadline to dismantle the outpost, which has about 30 homes.

But over the weekend, Netanyahu established a special committee to see how permits could be provided to keep the outpost from being torn down.

This has touched off yet another controversy over settlements, one of the most contentious issues between the Israelis and the Palestinians.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:21 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Social Security, Medicare Reaction Reflects Partisan, Election-Year Divide

Senior citizens protest threatened cuts to Social Security and Medicare in Chicago in November 2011.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:34 pm

Like a mirror that reflects one's ideology back at the viewer, and no more so than during a general-election year, the political players saw what they wanted, and what they thought was most politically useful to their side, in the reports Monday by the Social Security and Medicare trustees on the long-term prospects for those two entitlement programs.

Read more
Middle East
5:13 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Egyptians Warily Await Final Slate Of Candidates

During a demonstration at Cairo's Tahrir Square last week, veiled Egyptian women hold posters supporting Muslim cleric Hazem Abu Ismail, an ultra-conservative preacher who was disqualified from running for the presidential elections on technical grounds.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Egypt's election commission is expected to announce the final list of candidates this week for next month's presidential elections. But which candidate will win is far from clear.

A recent Egyptian poll shows nearly 40 percent of voters have no idea who to support. Another 30 percent who had decided will be forced to select someone else because their preferred candidates were among the 10 barred by election officials recently.

As a result, Egyptian voters who were once excited about the prospect of their first free presidential election are growing frustrated.

Read more
Politics
5:11 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

When Politicians Slip, Video Trackers Are There

In politics, video tracking has become normal. And it's a growth industry. There are trackers working for campaigns, political parties and, increasingly, political action committees.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:25 pm

Read more
It's All Politics
5:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Romney Takes Rubio On Road, Testing A Potential Running Mate

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney shakes hands with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., during a town hall-style meeting in Aston, Pa., on Monday.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:06 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigned outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh on Monday, a day before Pennsylvania and four other states hold their primary contests.

Romney isn't concerned about the primary, but Pennsylvania will likely be an important swing state in the general election. And Monday also offered a chance to audition a potential running mate: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Teen's Suicide Prompts Anti-Bullying Editorial

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Yesterday, the Sioux City Journal in Iowa did something it had never done before. It devoted the entire front page of its Sunday paper to an editorial. The headline, "We Must Stop Bullying, It Starts Here and It Starts Now." That editorial came soon after a 14-year-old Iowa boy named Kenneth Weishuhn committed suicide. He had been subjected to bullying and death threats after he told friends he was gay.

Mitch Pugh is editor of the Sioux City Journal and he joins me now.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Arab Tech Startups Try To Seize The Moment

The political changes brought about by the Arab Spring have raised hopes among high-tech entrepreneurs that this will translate into an improved business climate. Here, budding entrepreneurs work at Oasis 500, a seed investment firm in Amman, Jordan, on Nov. 2, 2011.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Social networking sites have been at the vanguard of the Arab uprisings over the past year. Egyptians used online pages to organize protests, and Syrian activists have posted frequent YouTube videos showing government forces shelling civilian areas.

The same growing Arab online awareness that made the Internet part of the pro-democracy movements has also created a mini-revolution for Arab technological business.

Due to regulation, limited infrastructure and governments wary of the Internet, the Middle East has not been the easiest place to launch a tech startup.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

President Obama Takes Steps To End Mass Atrocities

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

President Obama toured the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington today joined by Holocaust survivor, author and Nobel Laureate, Elie Wiesel. Mr. Obama said the U.S. must never again allow such atrocities to take place.

As NPR's Don Gonyea reports, the president also announced new tools to punish countries that use technology to track and target their citizens.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Report: Immigration From Mexico To U.S. Comes To Standstill

Pew

The historic wave of migration from Mexico to the United States, which over four decades brought 12 million immigrants to the country, has come to a standstill. That's what a new Pew Hispanic Center study released today found.

Read more
The Record
4:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91.
Keystone Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Even if you've never heard the name Bert Weedon before, his death on Friday, at the age of 91, deserves a salute: a chiming, perfectly fingered D major chord salute.

Read more
NPR Story
4:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

How Long Will Social Security Last?

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Social Security Trust Fund is being squeezed. It's now projected that the trust will no longer be able to fully fund benefits starting in 2033. That's more than two decades from now, but the new depletion date, as it's called, is three years earlier than last year's projections.

Read more

Pages