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Business
5:18 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 7:30 am

The International Labor Organization issued a report Monday warning that austerity measures imposed in many countries are hurting the job market, as well as failing to effectively reduce deficits. The major European economies received the brunt of the report's criticism. The report predicts a 3 percent rise in the global unemployment rate for 2012.

Business
5:18 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Eurozone Residents Strike Back At Austerity Measures

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 7:52 am

Steve Inskeep talks to John Peet, Europe Editor of The Economist about eurozone economies, and the backlash against austerity measures.

Business
5:18 am
Mon April 30, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 7:42 am

The structure will open in Tokyo next month. The building is nothing but a tower of steel and concrete — no offices, no apartments.

Author Interviews
3:37 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Caro's 'Passage of Power': LBJ's Political Genius

Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:26 am

Robert Caro writes obsessively about power. Fittingly, it's Lyndon Johnson — catapulted suddenly into the presidency "in the crack of a gunshot" — who consumes him.

The Passage of Power, the fourth volume of Caro's massive biography of Lyndon Johnson, is released this week. Caro has dedicated decades to meticulously researching Johnson's life, and the previous books in the series have been almost universally hailed as a significant achievement in American letters.

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Opinion
3:36 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Living To 100: The Story Of India's Pocket Hercules

Centenarian Manohar Aich sits at his home in Kolkata, India. Aich stood 4 feet 11 inches at his tallest, earning him the nickname "Pocket Hercules."
Bishan Samaddar

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:39 am

A fad that has been sweeping through middle-class India might look familiar to some Americans — it's a craze for fancy gym equipment. But when commentator Sandip Roy visited India's first Mr. Universe (who is known as the "Pocket Hercules") he found that the body builder has little patience for the new trend.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:35 am
Mon April 30, 2012

To Predict Dating Success, The Secret's In The Pronouns

People who are interested in and paying close attention to each other begin to speak more alike, a psychologist says.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 11:17 pm

On a recent Friday night, 30 men and 30 women gathered at a hotel restaurant in Washington, D.C. Their goal was love, or maybe sex, or maybe some combination of the two. They were there for speed dating.

The women sat at separate numbered tables while the men moved down the line, and for two solid hours they did a rotation, making small talk with people they did not know, one after another, in three-minute increments.

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Asia
3:34 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Drama Amid Indonesia's Disappearing Mangroves

A man gathering firewood to sell cuts down mangrove trees in the coastal area of Medan city on Indonesia's Sumatra island on Jan. 31. The country, which has one-quarter of the world's mangroves, is losing them at a rate of 6 percent a year. The coastal forests play important ecological and environmental roles.
Suntanta Aditya AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 7:36 am

The rising tide laps at the feet of local children and fishermen and submerges all but the tops of the mangrove trees of Tiwoho village in Indonesia's North Sulawesi province. At one degree of latitude north of the equator, the climate here is about the same all year round: hot, wet and perfect for the forests of salt-tolerant trees that grow along sheltered coastlines.

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Author Interviews
3:33 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Extremism In Congress: 'Even Worse Than It Looks'?

Mladen Antonov Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:53 am

Congressional scholars Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein are no strangers to D.C. politics. The two of them have been in Washington for more than 40 years — and they're renowned for their carefully nonpartisan positions.

But now, they say, Congress is more dysfunctional than it has been since the Civil War, and they aren't hesitating to point a finger at who they think is to blame.

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Election 2012
3:32 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Romney's Big-Dollar 'Bundlers' Stay Anonymous

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets supporters in Aston, Pa., on April 23.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:07 am

Every presidential nominee going back to 2000 has revealed the names of influential supporters known as "bundlers" because of the way they persuade others to give money to a candidate. Every nominee, that is, until Mitt Romney.

The most anyone can give directly to any presidential campaign is $5,000, and everyone who gives that much is listed in the Romney campaign's monthly disclosures.

When it comes to the bundlers, though, the campaign chooses to keep those names secret.

Voluntary Disclosure

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Education
3:31 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Economy Puts Value Of Liberal Arts Under Scrutiny

Wellesley College English professor Yoon Lee teaches a class on the rise of the novel.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:47 am

As high school seniors wrestle with big decisions before Tuesday's deadline about which college they want to go to, some of the nation's top liberal arts colleges are dealing with big decisions of their own. Many of the most elite private schools are trying to figure out how they may have to adapt at a time when they're seen as a more expensive — and less direct — path to landing a job.

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Asia
3:30 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Trade, Security On Agenda For Obama, Japan's Noda

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks during a reception at the Japanese Embassy in Washington on Sunday. Noda meets with President Obama at the White House on Monday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:09 am

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda are meeting at the White House on Monday — the first such meeting between U.S. and Japanese leaders in three years.

Political turmoil in Japan has led to a constant turnover in leadership: There have been six prime ministers in as many years.

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Media
5:48 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

If A Fact Dies In The Forest, Will Anyone Believe It?

A recent obituary in the Chicago Tribune mourned the death of facts. But are they truly dead?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 6:04 pm

According to columnist Rex Huppke, there was a recent death that you might have missed. It wasn't an actor, musician or famous politician, but facts.

In a piece for the Chicago Tribune, Huppke says facts – things we know to be true – are now dead.

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The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

State Of Emergency Raises The Stakes In Sudan

Tensions are rising between Sudan and it's recently-indepedent neighbor, South Sudan.
Adriane Ohanesian AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 6:42 am

Sudan has declared a state of emergency as tensions mount along the disputed border it shares with its new neighbor, South Sudan.

As the AP reports, declaring a state of emergency gives the government expanded powers of arrest. On Saturday, Sudanese officials claimed they had arrested four people, including three foreigners.

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Books
5:17 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Update: Judge's Favorites

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 5:48 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz checks-in with Three-Minute Fiction judge Luis Alberto Urrea to hear how the reading process is going and to hear some of his favorite stories thus far.

Around the Nation
3:41 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

New Hazard On The Horizon: Amateur Storm Chasers

Emergency responders are running headlong into a growing phenomenon: roads bottled up by swarms of tornado chasers
Matt Piechota YouTube

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 5:48 pm

When more than 100 tornadoes raked the Great Plains a couple of weeks ago, emergency responders ran headlong into a growing phenomenon: roads bottled up by swarms of tornado chasers.

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Music Interviews
10:03 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Marvin Sapp: Surviving Loss, 'Keeping It Moving'

Marvin Sapp's new album is titled I Win.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 5:48 pm

"Never Would Have Made It" is the biggest gospel hit of the past decade, and the man who sings it, Marvin Sapp, is quite possibly the biggest name in gospel today — a development that still surprises the Michigan pastor.

"I'm blown away by how that song has had the impact that it has had on so many people," Sapp tells NPR's Guy Raz. "All of us, I've learned, have gone through 'never would have made it' moments, and that's the reason why I believe that it resonates so strongly in so many people's lives."

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Middle East
10:02 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Egyptian Comedian's Case Raises Free Speech Concerns

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the Arab world's most popular comedic actors is facing jail time in Egypt after a judge ruled he insulted Islam in some of his past film roles. The case worries those already concerned about the growing influence of Islamists in Egypt. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has that story from Cairo.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Pop Culture
10:02 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Obama Said WHAT? At The Correspondents' Dinner?

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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World
10:02 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Japanese Leader To Make Rare White House Visit

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, back here in Washington, D.C., President Barack Obama will host Japan's prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, at the White House tomorrow. It's been more than three years since a Japanese head of state attended a White House summit.

Reporter Lucy Craft explains why.

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Sports
10:02 am
Sun April 29, 2012

In Hockey Playoffs, A Question Of Fairness

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now, let's turn our attention to the world of sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE BALL GAME")

WYNONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

GREENE: Life is a ball game, isn't it? Well, at least that's how Mike Pesca sees it. He is NPR's sports correspondent and also WEEKEND EDITION's guide to those intersections of sports and life. And he joins us now.

Hey, Mike.

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Asia
9:48 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Chinese Activist's Escape Quickens A Quiet Diplomacy

Chinese activist Chen Guangchen is believed to be under U.S. protection, possibly at the U.S. embassy in Beijing.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

A senior U.S. official, Kurt Campbell, has arrived on an unscheduled trip to Beijing, apparently to negotiate over Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, believed to be under U.S. protection. The fate of the activist puts both China and the U.S. in a tricky diplomatic bind, with no easy answers.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Canceling Out The 'Background Noise' On Egypt-Israel Relations

Bedouins watch flames rise in July 2011 after masked gunmen blew up a terminal of the Egyptian natural gas pipeline to Israel and Jordan. It was one of many attacks on the pipeline since the popular uprising that ousted longtime Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak last year.
AP

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:05 am

By ending a historic gas contract with Israel, is Egypt laying the groundwork for a fundamental shift in relations? Not quite, says Rob Malley of the International Crisis Group.

Malley, program director for the Middle East and North Africa, talks to NPR's David Greene on Weekend Edition about last week's announcement, which raised questions of political rifts. Malley says:

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Reporter's Notebook
8:18 am
Sun April 29, 2012

The L.A. Riots, As A Neighbor Remembers It

Smoke covers Los Angeles Thursday, April 30, 1992, as fires from the riots burn out of control.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Twenty years ago Sunday, Los Angeles erupted into destructive riots after the verdict in the Rodney King trial. The violence lasted six days and left more than 50 dead and over $1 billion in damage. NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates remembers; she lived in the one of the neighborhoods that went up in flames.

Several years ago, I interviewed Karl Fleming for the 40th anniversary of the Watts riots. He was a veteran journalist who'd covered the civil rights movement in the in the 1960s for Newsweek.

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Middle East
8:18 am
Sun April 29, 2012

For Israel And Egypt, A Relationship Under Strain

A mural in Cairo depicts the split faces of Egyptian military ruler Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, left, and ousted president Hosni Mubarak accompanied by Arabic that reads, "who assigned you did not die, No for gas export to Israel, the revolution continues."
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:04 am

Ever since Egypt's revolution last year, many Israelis have wondered what it might mean for the peace treaty that the two countries signed in 1979 – the first such agreement between Israel and an Arab state.

Israel's embassy in Egypt was attacked last September and badly damaged. Islamist parties sharply critical of Israel have proved popular, including the Muslim Brotherhood, which won Egypt's parliamentary elections.

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Monkey See
7:38 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Chris Colfer Goes From 'Glee' Singer To 'Struck' Screenwriter

Chris Colfer, writer and star of Struck By Lightning, at the Tribeca Film Festival, where the film is playing.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 11:39 am

Chris Colfer, one of the stars of the hit TV show Glee, is known for his portrayal of Kurt, a confident and openly gay high school student (who also possesses pipes like a diva). In the new film Struck By Lightning, which Colfer wrote, he plays a very different character: Carson Phillips, an ambitious high school student who starts a literary magazine in order to get into Northwestern University. The character is arrogant and not exactly well-liked, so how does he collect submissions? By blackmailing the popular kids, of course.

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Europe
6:27 am
Sun April 29, 2012

In Spain, The Church Offers More Than Salvation

A priest prays before a Mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI at the Cuatro Vientos air base outside Madrid during World Youth Day festivities in August 2011. The Catholic Church is hoping to provide an attractive option for young job seekers in Spain, which is suffering from unprecedented unemployment.
Jorge Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 11:38 am

Spain has Europe's highest unemployment rate, with nearly 1 in 4 people out of work. The country has dipped back into recession, and layoffs are on the rise.

But there's one organization there that's still hiring: the Catholic Church. A group of bishops has launched a savvy campaign on YouTube to recruit new priests from the swelling ranks of Spain's unemployed.

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Around the Nation
6:27 am
Sun April 29, 2012

After L.A. Riots, An Effort To Rebuild A Broken City

A fire burns out of control at the corner of 67th St. and West Blvd. in South Central Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. Hundreds of buildings burned when riots erupted after the verdicts in the Rodney King case were announced.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:33 pm

The Los Angeles riots began 20 years ago Sunday, when a jury acquitted four police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King in 1992.

While the ashes were still smoldering, then-Mayor Tom Bradley announced a new organization that would repair the shattered city, Rebuild L.A. Its mission was to spend five years harnessing the power of the private sector to replace and improve on what was lost. While it created a lot of hope, it created even more disappointment.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
6:25 am
Sun April 29, 2012

National Guard Members' Next Battle: The Job Hunt

The National Guard's 182nd Infantry Regiment returned home in March from a year in Afghanistan. One in three said they were unemployed or looking for work.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 12:31 pm

Before the soldiers of the 182nd Regiment of the Army National Guard came home, they were asked how many were unemployed or looking for work. The answer: about one in three.

As more soldiers return to civilian life, a civilian job may not be there waiting. Service members with the National Guard have the extra challenge of convincing employers to hire them when they may be called to active duty for a year or more. There are laws designed to protect vets from losing their jobs or promotions because of their service, but it's hard to prove when it happens.

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Education
5:31 pm
Sat April 28, 2012

Help For The Economy? Not From Debt-Bound Grads

Gan Golan of Los Angeles, dressed as the "Master of Degrees," holds a ball and chain representing his college loan debt during Occupy D.C. activities in Washington. Average in-state tuition and fees at four-year public colleges rose an additional $631 this fall, or 8.3 percent, compared with a year ago.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:39 am

In a little more than 10 years, the total amount of student loan debt in this country has doubled to more than $1 trillion. In the not too-distant-future, student loan debt will eclipse the amount of money Americans owe on their cars and credit cards.

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History
5:17 pm
Sat April 28, 2012

Operation Tiger: D-Day's Disastrous Rehearsal

A disastrous rehearsal for D-Day took place on Slapton Sands in southwestern England.
Terry Smith Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 6:12 pm

Sixty-eight years ago today, the Allies launched a massive dress rehearsal for the invasion of Normandy — the famous D-Day landings that would happen five weeks later. But that rehearsal turned into one of the war's biggest fiascos.

It took place on Slapton Sands, a beach in southwestern England. British historian Giles Milton wrote about the rehearsal on his blog last week.

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