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Science
5:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Summer Science: An Introduction

David Greene speaks with NPR's Joe Palca about Morning Edition's upcoming series, "Summer Science."

Europe
5:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Spanish Lender Gets $24 Billion Lifeline

Spain's third largest lender, Bankia, is getting a $24 billion lifeline from the Spanish government. The move is a part of Madrid's effort to return some stability to the country's struggling financial sector.

Around the Nation
5:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

A Conversation With Chief Of Hurricane Center

David Greene talks to Rick Knabb, the newly named head of the National Hurricane Center. Knabb is currently the Weather Channel's resident hurricane expert. When he previously worked at the National Hurricane Center as a meteorologist, he was one of the lead forecasters for Hurricane Katrina.

Interviews
6:56 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Blacks, Gays And The Church

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's turn to another story we've been following in recent weeks: African-Americans and same-sex marriage. When President Obama came out in support of gay marriage, some African-American religious leaders protested. But according to new polling data, African-Americans are no less supportive or, for that matter, opposed to gay marriage than any other group in the country.

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Interviews
6:56 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Why Music Matters

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 10:47 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Every few weeks on the program, we've been running an occasional series called Why Music Matters, where we bring you the stories of music fans in their own words, about how certain songs or even bands have changed their lives. Today's story comes from a young artist in Seattle. Her name is Vivi Perez, and she almost gave up on high school, that is until a community activist group called El Centro de la Raza introduced her to the music business.

VIVI PEREZ: I felt kind of, like, I didn't know where I was going a lot in high school.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Security Council Condemns Syrian Government For Killings

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 6:45 am

The U.N. Security Council is condemning the Syrian government for the massacre of scores of people, including children, in the town of Houla, a day after images of the mass killings shocked the world.

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It's All Politics
5:46 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Polls Show Obama's Support For Gay Marriage Influencing Blacks

President Obama is seen on a monitor in the White House briefing room May 9. In an interview with ABC, he said he supports gay marriage.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 11:27 am

In this space earlier this month, I wrote about whether President Obama would face a backlash from African-Americans for his endorsement of same-sex marriage. (He hasn't.) I made mention of a random field experiment in which 285 black people in Cook County, Ill., were polled about gay marriage.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Ahead Of Memorial Day, Veterans Remember

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:56 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

In a few minutes, the latest on the reports of a massacre in Syria that may have left at least 30 children dead. But first to our cover story today.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: OK, veterans. Veterans, look here for just a few minutes.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Syrian Government Suspected Of Massacre

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 7:49 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

The United Nations Security Council has condemned Syria for an attack in the central part of the country yesterday that left at least 90 people dead, dozens of them children. The council once again called on Syria's government to halt further violence against its civilians. Here's NPR's Kelly McEvers with more from Beirut.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Disability Claims Rise Among Veterans

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:56 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Returning now to veterans on this Memorial Day weekend. Close to one out of two veterans who've served in Iraq or Afghanistan have now filed disability claims for service-related injuries - everything from hearing loss and back problems to mental health claims like PTSD. The percentage of vets making claims now is more than double the rate of previous wars. The total cost could eventually come to close to a trillion dollars.

Marilynn Marchione of the Associated Press reported on the staggering increase and what might explain it.

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Pop Culture
2:15 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Hey! You! The Unstoppable Rise Of Heckling

An unidentified heckler lets loose as President Obama begins a speech at the Martin Luther King memorial dedication in Washington, D.C., in October 2011.
Mannie Garcia UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 7:51 pm

As summer nears, Great American Hecklers are being spotted all over the place.

You can see them β€” and hear their calls β€” at commencements, sporting events, political gatherings. Hecklers on the right and hecklers on the left.

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Pop Culture
2:09 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

A Rapper Ruined In An Online Firestorm

Tablo, also known as Dan Lee, really did earn both a bachelor's and a master's degree from Stanford β€” in less than four years.
Hee Chul Kim WireImage

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am

Dan Lee goes by the name Tablo. He's a rapper and one of Korea's most famous artists. He's also been at the center of a media storm, but not because of his music. His is a story of pop-culture paranoia and conspiracy.

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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Sun May 27, 2012

At Eurovision, A Dance Around Human Rights

Sweden's Loreen, the winner of the Eurovision 2012, performs at the Grand Final of the song contest in the Azerbaijan's capital Baku, early on Sunday.
Vyacheslav Oseledko AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 10:43 am

Under flashing lights, Swedish singer Loreen danced barefooted to first place in the 2012 Eurovision competition early Sunday morning. The contest's backdrop: Baku, Azerbaijan. While Europe fell in love with Loreen's song, "Euphoria," stories of abuse on the streets were leaking out.

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Sports
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Women Push Their Limits In Pro Cycling Race

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

The Exergy Tour began Thursday night in Boise, Idaho. It's the largest women's five-day stage race in North America. It's also the last major race before cycling teams are chosen for the Olympics in London. This Tour is meant to raise the bar for women's cycling but as Sadie Babits reports, the race began with a major upset.

Religion
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The State Of The Church

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

The Catholic Church has been in the public spotlight a lot this year. The issues of contraception and gay marriage have been part of the presidential campaign and church leaders have weighed in. There have also been new revelations in a case involving leaked Vatican documents, and it may actually be a case where the butler did it. Host Rachel Martin speaks with John Allen, a senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

Middle East
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Is Latest Attack In Syria A Game Changer?

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

The United Nations has confirmed that at least 90 people were killed by tank shells and artillery fire in central Syria this weekend. While the UN did not outright say this was the work of the Syrian army, activists and residents say the military is the only institution that has such weapons. NPR's Kelly McEvers in Beirut tells host Rachel Martin the latest.

Around the Nation
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Reporting The American Dream

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

Throughout the summer, NPR News will look at the history, culture and current state of the American Dream. NPR's Ari Shapiro and John Ydstie join host Rachel Martin to take a political and economic look at the ultimate American aspiration.

Commentary
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Moment That Forever Changed A Soldier's Outlook

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. In this installment, Spc. Michael Cella remembers a close call while on patrol.

Sports
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Musings On The NBA Draft Lottery

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca, who has an off-speed pitch on the week's sports news.

Presidential Race
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Under Summer Sun, Presidential Race Heats Up

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Scott Horsley about the aggressive campaigning in recent weeks by both President Obama and Mitt Romney. Both men are focusing on jobs and the economy.

Children's Health
8:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Military Children Act Out: Performing 'Deployment'

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:55 am

Since 2001, more than 700,000 American children have had one or more parents deployed overseas by the military. Missed birthdays and other milestones become a part of life for military kids who are not always vocal about their feelings. In Grand Forks, N.D., a play called Deployed helped give some of them a voice. Meg Luther Lindholm reports.

Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
6:35 am
Sun May 27, 2012

After A Year In Afghanistan, Memories That Stick

Michael Currie was stationed in Afghanistan for the past year, leaving behind his wife and daughters. His most vivid memory of his service was the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 4:40 pm

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National Teachers Initiative
6:34 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 9:39 am

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

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Religion
6:32 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Philadelphia Priest Abuse Trial Takes Combative Turn

Monsignor William Lynn leaves the Criminal Justice Center in Philadelphia in March. When he finally took to the stand after two months of testimony, the prosecutor called him a liar over and over.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 7:25 pm

A clergy sex-abuse trial is intensifying in a Philadelphia courtroom. One defendant is James Brennan, a priest accused of trying to rape a minor.

What's drawing attention is the second defendant, Monsignor William Lynn. Lynn is the first high-level Catholic official to be criminally prosecuted β€” not for abusing minors himself, but for failing to protect children from predator priests.

Failure To Protect?

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Economy
6:32 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Help Wanted. But Not For Mid-Level Jobs

Job seekers fill out applications at a job fair in the Queens borough of New York City earlier this month. Economists say jobs in the middle β€” in sales, administration and assembly, for example β€” are being squeezed.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 7:49 pm

Unemployment figures for May come out Friday. While the numbers will show how many jobs have been added or lost, they won't tell us much about the quality of positions filled or illustrate what economists already know: that the middle of the job market is hollowing out.

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History
6:31 am
Sun May 27, 2012

75 Years Later: Building The Golden Gate Bridge

San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937, connecting San Francisco to Marin County in the north.
George Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 11:29 am

Seventy-five years ago today, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened to the public. People walked across the bridge for the first time, marveling at what was then the largest suspension bridge in the world.

Before the project began, many people thought building the bridge was impossible. And when the construction started, most thought that dozens would die in the process. The rule of thumb at the time was that for every million dollars spent on a project, one person would die β€” and the Golden Gate Bridge was going to cost $37 million.

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Election 2012
5:47 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

Outside Money Making The Race A Billionaire's Game

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 9:59 am

Hotshot political consultant Matt Mackowiak is a rising star in the very lucrative world of political consulting. His firm, the Potomac Strategy Group, helps Republicans win elections, but he's not working with Gov. Mitt Romney's campaign this election year.

People who are part of Mackowiak's tribe β€” the strategists, the opposition researchers, the pollsters β€” are discovering that they can have a much bigger impact working for outside groups that can raise unlimited amounts of money, unencumbered by the rules that restrict what a presidential campaign can do.

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NPR Story
5:02 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

D.C. Mayor's Administration Mired In Cloud Of Scandal

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 6:44 pm

Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray was elected to office on a platform of anti-corruption. But just two years into his term, a federal investigation has left two former aides pleading guilty to misdeeds during the 2010 election. Gray has denied any wrongdoing. Host Guy Raz talks about D.C. politics with Washington Post reporter Nikita Stewart.

Digital Life
4:45 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

In A World Where One Teen's Voice Is An Internet Hit

Jake Foushee's "movie trailer" voice went viral when he was 14. Now he may be headed for the big screen.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 9:17 pm

Jake Foushee had a cold.

He was 13 at the time, at his home outside Chapel Hill, N.C.

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Music Interviews
3:28 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

The Lumineers: Chasing Big Dreams Out West

The Denver folk ensemble The Lumineers has released its self-titled debut album. From left: Wes Schultz, Neyla Pekarek and Jeremiah Fraites.
Hayley Young Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 6:44 pm

The Denver folk group The Lumineers was founded in 2002 by Wesley Schultz and Jeremiah Fraites, who grew up together in the New Jersey suburb of Ramsey. In its early days, the band had its sights on nearby New York as the gateway to success.

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