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It's All Politics
3:07 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Late Conservative Blogger Breitbart Had Impact On Right, Left

In life, Andrew Breitbart was the conservative blogger and provocateur whose sometimes controversial efforts against his ideological adversaries, both real and imagined, made him one of the most polarizing figures on the contemporary political scene.

In death, however, it was clear Breitbart had earned the respect not just of conservatives but of some progressives, too, who may have disagreed with his political views and tactics, but admired his energy and the entrepreneurial spirit with which he waged his campaign.

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Middle East
2:55 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

In Iran's Election, Not All Candidates Are Welcome

Women sit at a bus stop under election posters in Qom, about 75 miles south of Iran's capital, Tehran, on Tuesday. Iran's parliamentary elections on Friday are expected to be a contest between various conservative factions. Many candidates seeking change have been barred from running.
Raheb Homavandi Reiters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 6:10 pm

Iran holds parliamentary elections on Friday, the first since the disputed, and many believe fraudulent, presidential election in 2009.

But unlike that presidential poll, candidates seeking to take on the country's conservative rulers will not be taking part Friday; they are mostly under house arrest or have been in prison for years now.

The focus will be on which conservatives end up on top and how many votes are cast.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Ariz. Sheriff Arpaio Will Release Findings On Obama's Birth Certificate

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio in 2011.
Ross D. Franklin AP

You might have thought that with the feds knocking on his door over what they say are numerous violations of civil rights, Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio would be busy planning his defense.

Instead, the controversial sheriff is taking the fight to them. Arpaio announced that he was ready to release the findings of his investigation into the authenticity of President Obama's birth certificate.

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NPR Story
1:52 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

'Beautiful Souls': Unlikely Resisters Inspired To Stand

Beautiful Souls explores why four brave individuals choose to stand up for what's right.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

In Beautiful Souls: Saying No, Breaking Ranks, And Heeding The Voice of Conscience In Dark Times, journalist Eyal Press writes about "unexceptional people who took great risks" to help others.

The book profiles four individuals — a Serbian solider, a financial whistle blower, a Swiss police officer and an Israeli soldier — all unlikely resisters who end up going to great lengths to challenge authority.

Press talks with NPR's John Donvan about the things that inspire ordinary people to take a stand.

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Books
1:50 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Trading The Road Of Anger For The Path To 'Patience'

In Patience, meditation instructor Allan Lokos says peacefulness is an art that you can practice, develop and build.
Tarcher

Patience is a virtue that can be hard to recover when you're trapped in rush-hour traffic or stuck in a long line at the bank.

In Patience: The Art of Peaceful Living, Allan Lokos explains the importance of abandoning anger and unhappiness and walking the path to patience.

Lokos, founder and guiding teacher at The Community Meditation Center in New York, talks with NPR's John Donvan about how to master the art of patience.

The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Russia, China Join Call For Syria To Let U.N. Human Rights Official Visit

In what Israel's Haaretz.com is referring to as a "rare move" by longtime supporters of Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime, Russia and China today joined other members of the U.N. Security Council in calling on Syria to let U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos see what's happening inside that nation.

Syria so far has not allowed Amos to visit.

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Europe
1:30 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

As Election Nears, Russians Express Frustrations

Thousands of Russians form a 10-mile human chain around a Moscow ring road on Monday during an opposition protest against Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. He is expected to win the March 4 presidential elections but is facing growing opposition.
UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 6:10 pm

Cars decorated with white ribbons and carnations drove around Moscow's Garden Ring Road in a wet snow this past Sunday, honking cheerfully to the thousands of demonstrators on the sidewalk who formed a human chain around the city.

Elena Korobova was a link in that chain.

"I want to get rid of Putin, because I don't like his policy, I don't like what he's doing for Russia," she says of Vladimir Putin, Russia's current prime minister.

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The Salt
1:17 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

States Crack Down On Animal Welfare Activists And Their Undercover Videos

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 3:00 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
1:04 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Majorities In Senate And Public Support Birth Control Coverage

Suitable for health insurance coverage?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 6:10 pm

The Senate has turned back an attempt to kill President Obama's new rules requiring most health insurance plans to provide contraceptives without additional cost.

The 51-48 vote against an amendment to an unrelated highway bill (Yes, that's just how the Senate works) was mostly along party lines.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Data Mining: Does Online Privacy Matter?

Google combined more than 60 privacy policies in order to streamline the information that it collects about its users. Google says it hopes to create a "beautifully simple, intuitive user experience across Google." Critics say the new policy digs deeper into users' lives.

Digital Life
1:00 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

A Case For And Against Proper Spelling

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

When we speak to one another, word order counts. For example, I'm speaking to you right now in pretty conventional word order - subject before verb before object. But what if I took what I just said and I moved the words around like this: For example, now speaking pretty, I'm conventional, verb, object before, and now you order before subject to word. Maybe you followed that. But is the concept really different when it comes to spelling? Recently, a debate broke out between Wired columnist Anne Trubek and Lee Simmons, a copy editor there.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Venezuela's Chávez Says He's 'Fine' After Surgery

A huge photograph of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is displayed on the facade of state-owned oil company PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela) in Caracas on Wednesday. The text reads, "Move forward, commander."
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

After undergoing surgery for a lesion on his pelvis, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez made his first public comments on Thursday.

"I am fine, my recovery is accelerating," he said via phone to Venezuelan state TV, according the AP. "A greeting, a hug to you all!"

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Senate Says No To Challenge Of Obama's Birth Control Policy

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 12:21 pm

By a 51-48 vote, the Senate just set aside an effort to reverse the Obama administration's policy requiring most employers to provide health insurance plans that cover the cost of women's contraception methods.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Syrian Activist: 'It's Snowing And We're Shaking Here'

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 12:22 pm

According to activists inside and outside Syria, the government's 27-day siege against the opposition stronghold of Baba Amr has now succeeded. Initial reports suggest that forces are entering this neighborhood in the city of Homs, but details are sketchy at best because most of the reporters and citizen journalists covering the story have either fled or died.

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Television
11:57 am
Thu March 1, 2012

It's High Concept, But Will It Keep You 'Awake'?

In the new NBC drama Awake, Jason Issacs plays Michael Britten, a man who survives a car accident along with one of his loved ones — but which one?
Michael Desmond NBC

The premise of NBC's new detective series, Awake, is about as high concept as it gets. Jason Isaacs, one of the leads of Showtime's Brotherhood, stars as Michael Britten, who survives a horrible car crash intact. Well, his body is intact — but his mind, or at least his subconscious, is split.

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It's All Politics
11:56 am
Thu March 1, 2012

In Delegate Race, Romney's Victories Amount To Less Than Meets The Eye

Mitt Romney had a big night Tuesday — with victories in two states over insurgent Rick Santorum, thereby increasing his margin over Santorum by ... six delegates?

As improbable as it might seem, the combination of Michigan's delegate allocation rule and Arizona's rule-violating winner-take-all contest could mean that Romney's twin victories provide him little ultimate benefit — and highlight again the dual-track GOP primary campaign season.

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Africa
11:34 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Americans Detained In Egypt Now Allowed To Leave

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 12:18 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. American democracy activists held in Egypt are headed home today. The nongovernmental organizations whose employees were being held confirmed that the travel ban had been lifted. The workers were being held in Egypt on charges of fomenting unrest. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is in Cairo, and she joins us now on the line.

Soraya, how many people are leaving Egypt altogether - I mean Americans?

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World
11:30 am
Thu March 1, 2012

An Inuit Builder Crafts His Last Canoe

Goudie's last canoe hangs next to the form used to mold the wood. The unfinished canoe is weighted down with sandbags to keep the canvas taut.
Emma Jacobs

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 5:25 pm

In a remote corner of northern Canada, Joe Goudie is at work on his very last boat for sale.

The Inuit community in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador once used wood and canvas canoes to navigate the rivers of Labrador.

Goudie, 72, is Inuit, but grew up as that tradition was drawing to a close.

Today, he's the last person building wooden canoes in this corner of Canada.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Detained Americans On Their Way Out Of Egypt

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 12:28 pm

  • Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson on 'Morning Edition'

Seven American democracy advocates who had been prevented for weeks from leaving Egypt and were accused of being there illegally are now on their way out of the country, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo.

"They are walking through security in the VIP terminal at the Cairo Airport," she just said in an email to our Newscast desk.

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Author Interviews
11:24 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Masha Gessen: How Vladimir Putin Rose To Power

Media suppression, corruption and the murder of political rivals have marked the regime of Vladimir Putin, who is running for his third term as president in Russia's election next week. Despite mass demonstrations, he's expected to win.

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Media
10:23 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Conservative Publisher Breitbart Dead At 43

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 12:18 pm

Conservative publisher Andrew Breitbart died Thursday in Los Angeles. For more on the Breitbart's life, Steve Inskeep talks with Dave Weigel of Slate.com.

Shots - Health Blog
10:02 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Online Therapy Helps Teens Recover From Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Getting a teenager online may sometimes be the healthy thing to do.
iStockPhoto.com

Give some teenagers access to the Internet, and they'll feel better.

That's the conclusion of a new study that found that teens with chronic fatigue syndrome who got six months of online behavioral therapy were far more likely to recover than those given care in person.

"The use of Internet seems to appeal to modern youth reflected in our high participation rate (96 percent of eligible adolescents entered the study) and follow-up rates (97 percent)," the lead researcher, Sanne Nijhof, told Shots via email.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Andrew Breitbart, Controversial Web Provocateur, Has Died

Andrew Breitbart last June.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Andrew Breitbart, who cultivated controversy with his BigGovernment website and was a conservative thorn in the sides of many liberals, has died, his newssite's editor-in-chief, Joel Pollak, just said he can confirm. He emailed that word to The Two-Way moments ago.

In a post on BigGovernment, it's reported that "Andrew passed away unexpectedly from natural causes shortly after midnight this morning in Los Angeles." He would turn 43 this year.

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It's All Politics
9:40 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Thursday Political Grab Bag: Obama To Call For End To Oil Company Tax Breaks

With Republicans blaming his energy policies for higher gas prices and rising fears that U.S. gas prices could hit an average of $5 a gallon, President Obama on Thursday will renew a call Democrats make whenever oil prices rise that Congress repeal tax breaks for oil companies.

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The Two-Way
9:00 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Anti-Assad Fighters Said To Be Retreating From Beseiged Syrian District

Syrian mourners on Wednesday carried the body of a man who was killed in fighting near Homs.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

There are reports from several news outlets that fighters who have been battling the Syrian Army in the beseiged Baba Amr district of Homs are retreating from that area.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Jobless Claims Ticked Down Again, Consumer Spending Edged Up

There were 2,000 fewer first-time claims for unemployment last week than in the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

It says there were 351,000 such filings.

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Music Reviews
8:22 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Hugh Masekela: Wedding Songs That Don't Sound Blue

Hugh Masekela.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 27, 2012 8:50 am

In 1968, Hugh Masekela was not quite 30 years old and though he was in exile from his homeland of South Africa, he seemed ready to become at home on the American jazz and pop markets. That summer, he had scored a number one single, "Grazing in the Grass." A year earlier, he'd been one of the few international performers at the 1967 Monterrey International Pop Festival and had appeared in its D.A. Pennebaker documentary. Yet strangely enough, over the next 45 years Masekela never quite found his sweet spot.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Death Toll From Midwest, Southern Storms Put At 13

Vehicles and other possessions lie scattered in Harrisburg, Ill.
Scott Olson Getty Images

A fourth death in Tennessee appears to have brought the toll from severe storms that swept through parts of the Midwest and South on Wednesday to at least 13.

Chrissy Keuper of WUOT-FM in at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville has told our Newscast Desk about the fourth fatality in the Volunteer State.

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Business
7:34 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Virgin Atlantic Hires Whispering Coach

The airline hired the coach to train its flight attendants to speak in hushed tones while serving passengers. Crews will be trained on tone and volume. The low tones are reserved for Virgin's new upper class dream suite.

The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Two More Americans Killed In Afghanistan

Feb. 23: Afghan demonstrators burn a U.S. flag during a protest in Afghanistan's Helmand province.
AFP/Getty Images
  • NPR's Tom Bowman, on 'Morning Edition'

Two more American military personnel were killed in Southern Afghanistan today when, officials believe, an Afghan civilian grabbed a weapon from an Afghan soldier and opened fire, NPR's Quil Lawrence reports from Kabul. At least one other attacker may also have been involved.

Quil adds that "we don't know yet whether this attack is linked to the Quran burnings, which set off so much violence — including the killing of four U.S. servicemen in the week that followed."

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