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Election 2012
5:45 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Walker Moves Forward As The Right's Newest 'Hero'

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (center) is greeted by his Cabinet and staff Wednesday at the state Capitol in Madison, a day after defeating Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in a recall election.
Andy Manis AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Republican Gov. Scott Walker triumphantly returned to the Wisconsin Capitol Wednesday, fresh off of his decisive victory in Tuesday's bitter recall election.

The governor appears to be emerging from the tough recall fight stronger, and with his national profile rising.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Was Miss USA Pageant Rigged? Trump Says No, Plans To Sue

The former Miss Pennsylvania, Sheena Monnin.
Darren Decker AP

Barely a day after she competed in the Miss USA beauty contest, Miss Pennsylvania Sheena Monnin tore off her sash and fired a scorching resignation:

"In good conscience I can no longer be affiliated in any way with an organization I consider to be fraudulent, lacking in morals, inconsistent, and in many ways trashy."

Trashy? There's a surprising perjorative from a woman who says on Facebook she's spent a decade associated with the pageant.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

From Our Readers: Bradbury's Wine

Dandelion Wine -- first a short story in 1953 and then a novel in 1957 — may not wield as much name recognition as Fahrenheit 451, but it is the late Ray Bradbury's most personal work. This sensory tribute to his boyhood summers in Illinois begins:

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Shots - Health Blog
5:04 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis A 'Serious Epidemic' In China

Gao Weiwei, a doctor of the Beijing Chest Hospital which specializes in the treatment of tuberculosis, talks to a patient suspected to have tuberculosis at the hospital in Tongzhou, near Beijing, March 27, 2009.
Ng Han Guan AP

China's first national survey of tuberculosis has produced some of the worst TB news in years.

Out of the million Chinese who develop TB every year, researchers say at least 110,000 get a form that's resistant to the mainstay drugs isoniazid and rifampin. Patients with such multidrug-resistant or MDR tuberculosis have to be treated for up to two years with expensive second-line drugs that are toxic and less effective.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

At The Equivalent Of 118 MPG, Honda Fit EV Becomes Most Fuel Efficient Car

The new all-electric 2013 Honda Fit EV is seen during its debut at the Los Angeles Auto Show, in Los Angeles.
Reed Saxon AP

The 2013 Honda Fit EV received the best fuel efficiency rating the Environmental Protection Agency has ever issued. The AP reports that the EPA said the electric vehicle gets the equivalent of 118 MPG.

The AP reports:

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Europe
4:50 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Spain Needs Cash, But Please Don't Call It A Bailout

A Spanish protester bangs on a pot outside the offices of Bankia in Madrid. Spain's banks are hurting and in need of an infusion of capital.
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Spain's banks are struggling and the country's leaders are sending mixed signals about whether they can afford to rescue them, or whether they'll need to ask for outside help.

But one thing is clear: Spanish leaders are trying to avoid calling any potential rescue plan a bailout.

Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos dismisses talk of a bailout for Spanish banks.

"We'll make whatever decisions we need in the future," De Guindos told reporters in Brussels. And that won't be for weeks, after audits of Spanish banks, he said.

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The Salt
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Many Food Workers Keep Working While Sick, Survey Finds

Workers harvest cantaloupe near Firebaugh, Calif.
Gosia Wosniacka AP

We've all probably been there, at work, feeling crummy, when we should be home in bed. Maybe we do it because we need the money, or we feel like we can't miss that super important meeting. But what if you work with food and coming in sick means potentially infecting hundreds of other people?

A coalition of food labor groups says it happens a lot, and they blame the lack of paid sick days for people who pick, process, sell, cook and serve food.

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Business
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Good Times For Airlines, So Where Are The Deals?

A Delta Air Lines flight takes off from the Ronald Regan National Airport in Washington, D.C. As the price of oil trickles down, the airline industry is projected to have a historic good year.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

The rest of the economy may not be doing great, but airlines are expecting a banner year. Profitability is up and fuel prices are declining, but that's not necessarily great news for consumers.

When Robert Herbst, a former pilot and industry consultant for many years, says the skies are blue, it sounds pretty convincing. And from Herbst's projections, this may be a historic year for the airline industry.

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All Tech Considered
4:40 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

IPv6: A New Internet Expands The Web By Trillions Of Addresses

A new version of the Internet protocol system called IPv6 launched Wednesday, adding trillions upon trillions of new Internet addresses.
Courtesy of the Internet Society

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:31 pm

You may not have noticed when you woke up today, but the Internet universe expanded overnight by the trillions.

Today at midnight, Greenwich Mean Time, the new Internet protocol system IPv6 was born, bringing "more than 340 trillion, trillion, trillion" extra Internet protocol addresses into the world, according to the Internet Society, the nonprofit, Internet policy organization that is behind the system's launch and also controls the .org domain.

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The Record
4:25 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk

A contemporary Clinton sans dreadlocks.
William Thoren

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:43 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
4:16 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

To Count As A Young Scientist, Anything Less Than 52 Will Do

You're not getting older, you're getting better.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:53 am

I always suspected that the pursuit of science could keep a person young — or at least young at heart.

Now I have evidence. Sort of.

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, a charity that helps raise money to support the NIH, today announced the Lurie Prize. A $100,000 check awaits a "promising young scientist in biomedical research" with the right stuff.

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It's All Politics
4:14 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Bad Day For Unions Made Worse By Calif. Public Pension Initiatives

San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders at a rally for supporters of Proposition B Tuesday, June 5, 2012.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:02 pm

Tuesday was, unquestionably, a very bad day for public-employee unions and not just for the reason that got most of the attention, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's success in fending off an attempt to oust him through a recall election.

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Election 2012
3:52 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

N.D. Senate Race Could Be Next National Battleground

Democratic Senate candidate Heidi Heitkamp greets a supporter before a town hall meeting in Minot, N.D., on May 3.
Dale Wetzel AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Republicans need a net pickup of four seats to win control of the U.S. Senate this November. One opportunity they see is in North Dakota, where longtime Democratic incumbent Kent Conrad has decided not to run for a sixth term.

Republican Rep. Rick Berg is expected to win the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary. If he does, he'll face Democrat Heidi Heitkamp.

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Politics
3:50 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

What Wisconsin's Recall Means For Labor Unions

Rick Muir, president of the Indiana Federation of Teachers, chanted with other protesters at the Statehouse in Indianapolis in February 2011 over legislation limiting collective bargaining for teachers. Months later, it became law.
AJ Mast AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:06 pm

The Wisconsin recall election might have failed, but it succeeded in sending an ominous message to pro-labor forces across the nation — especially in the Midwest, where a handful of legislatures are pushing to roll back collective bargaining and other union rights.

The vote against Republican Gov. Scott Walker was prompted by his support for a law limiting collective bargaining for some public sector employees. His victory Tuesday night could embolden governors in states such as Ohio, Indiana and Missouri to push back harder on labor rights.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

In New York, Hispanic Small Business Owners Must Prove Their Ethnicity

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 4:58 pm

Who is Latino? Who counts as Native American?

The debate over who is considered a minority was brought to the spotlight by the Senate race in Massachusetts. Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren claimed she had Native American heritage, but there's no records to indicate that. Still, Warren insists that she learned of her background through family stories and that she is proud of her heritage.

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Music Reviews
2:44 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Japandroids: One Part Classic Rock, One Part Punk

Japandroids is guitarist Brian King (left) and drummer David Prowse.
Simone Cecchetti

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 12:39 pm

The rock band Japandroids is two men, not from Tokyo but from Vancouver, British Columbia — guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse. Both of them sang and very often shouted on their 2009 LP Post-Nothing, which received a lot of praise from music blogs. Their second album is out now; it's called Celebration Rock, and I think it's the best rock record I've heard this year.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

PHOTOS: The Enterprise Travels Up The Hudson River To Its New Home

The shuttle was navigated through Coney Island and Staten Island from Jersey City.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

The shuttle Enterprise made a incredible trip up the Hudson River by barge, today. The shuttle was framed by New York City's skyline and eventually it will be hoisted from the barge to its new home at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum.

Here are some pictures from the Enterprise's journey:

Monkey See
2:34 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Ray Bradbury: Finding Our Reflections Where We Didn't Expect Them

This 1966 file photo shows science fiction writer Ray Bradbury looking at a picture that was part of a school project to illustrate characters in one of his dramas.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:19 am

Heinlein, Asimov and Bradbury; they were the tripod (invasive, moving, with lasers) on which my science fiction education was built in the 1970s. This was somewhat self-selected, because once you — or I — grew out of Danny Dunn and Journey to the Mushroom Planet and Tom Swift, Jr., they were the inevitable destinations, the planets with the heaviest gravity wells in the sci-fi solar system.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Buckley Skewers Washington In 'They Eat Puppies'

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 2:38 pm

In Christopher Buckley's latest political satire, They Eat Puppies, Don't They? a lobbyist teams up with a conservative policy wonk to spread a rumor that China is plotting to assassinate the Dalai Lama. Together, they create a huge disinformation campaign that nearly sparks World War III.

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The Two-Way
2:11 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Economy Grew At 'Moderate Pace' In April And May, Federal Reserve Says

Anecdotal reports from across the nation "suggest overall economic activity expanded at a moderate pace" from early April through late May, the Federal Reserve just reported.

In its "beige book" review of conditions around the country, the Fed said the only one of its 12 bank districts to report slower growth was Philadelphia.

The report also adds that:

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Politics
2:02 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Walker's Victory Tests Progressives' Strength

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 2:22 pm

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker survived his recall election, a victory that may signal trouble for Democrats at the national level come November. NPR's Political Junkie columnist Ken Rudin and Katrina Vanden Heuvel of The Nation talk about what Walker's victory means for progressives.

Politics
2:02 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Grenell On Foreign Policy And Being Gay In The GOP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 2:31 pm

Richard Grenell recently explained that Mitt Romney chose him to serve as his foreign policy adviser based on his record and abilities. The Romney campaign, he says, also knew he was openly gay. Grenell explains why he resigned, and where Romney and President Obama differ on foreign policy.

National Security
2:02 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

How The President Decides To Make Drone Strikes

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 2:48 pm

For a new book, Kill or Capture, investigative reporter Dan Klaidman examined how President Obama came to embrace the drone program, and the closed-door process that determines under what circumstances drones are deployed. He talks about the administration's growing reliance on covert attacks.

The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

The Bush Tax Cuts: Obama's Surrogates Add Confusion To Democratic Position

Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers speaks during a discussion about tax codes and revenue hosted by the Brookings Institute on May 3 in Washington.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:32 pm

Did Larry Summers, the president's first National Economic Council director, just become the second Obama surrogate to stray from the talking points and endorse an extension of the Bush-era tax cuts?

Those tax cuts, which the Obama administration has said it will not extend for the very rich, are due to expire at the end of the year. Along with deep cuts in government spending scheduled to take place at the same time, many have called the end of the year a "fiscal cliff" that would plunge the economy back into recession.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Commenters Bite Back On The Paleo Diet

Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.)
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:52 pm

Our post on the paleo diet moving from the CrossFit gym to the doctor's office generated a robust discussion here in our comments section (and on NPR's Facebook page).

Readers batted around the relative merits of the paleo diet, how to interpret Paleolithic man's short lifespan and the meaning of evolutionary medicine, among other issues.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Delta CEO Pushes For National Airline Policy That Lets 'Free Market Work'

A traveler walks by a Delta Airlines skycap kiosk at San Francisco International Airport.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

"Airlines are expecting a banner year," NPR's Yuki Noguchi is due to report on All Things Considered later today.

More planes are flying with full passenger loads, as any frequent flier will tell you. Mergers have helped cut costs. Ticket prices are up. Airlines are charging fees for bags. Fuel costs have eased a bit.

In these relatively good times, what does an airline CEO want?

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Remembrances
12:46 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

The Curious Life Of Futurist Author Ray Bradbury

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Some sad news this morning: The world has lost a literary giant. Author Ray Bradbury died last night after a long illness. He was 91 years old. He wrote such classics as "The Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451" - futuristic tales from a man who never used a computer, or even drove a car. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more on Bradbury and his curious life.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Barbara Walters Apologizes For Trying To Help Assad Aide

Barbara Walters attends the "Today" show 60th anniversary celebration at the Edison Ballroom in New York in January.
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:18 pm

The television journalist Barbara Walters apologized yesterday after leaked emails showed that she offered to help an aide to Syrian President Bashar Assad land a job in the U.S. after the aide helped Walters secure an interview with the despot.

The AP reports:

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Remembrances
12:22 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

'Fahrenheit 451' Author Ray Bradbury Dies At 91

Ray Bradbury's career spanned more than 70 years — during which he transported readers to other dimensions with his futuristic and innovative stories. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 8:17 pm

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car.

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the stairs.

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It's All Politics
12:06 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

California Primary Sets Up Same-Party U.S. House Contests In November

A voter marks her ballot in the California primary in Sacramento on Tuesday.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:17 pm

California's new truly open primary held Tuesday could result in single-party matchups in November for eight of the state's 53 U.S. House seats.

While some results remained unofficial Wednesday morning, five congressional districts were certain to have Democrat-vs.-Democrat races on Nov. 6, while a sixth looked likely; two districts could have Republican-vs.-Republican contests.

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