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11:30 am
Mon April 2, 2012

N.H. Parents On Their Own In Abuse, Neglect Cases

The New Hampshire Supreme Court is expected to rule on whether it is constitutional to require indigent parents to represent themselves in child abuse or neglect proceedings.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

In most places in the U.S., if a parent is charged with abuse or neglect of a child and can't afford a lawyer, he's appointed one. That lawyer's job is to defend the parent and reunite the family if possible.

But faced with a budget shortfall, New Hampshire has taken the unusual step of eliminating that funding.

The court and state officials charged with enforcing the new policy now worry that the lack of representation is hurting parents and their children — and children's advocates are concerned that other states may eventually follow New Hampshire's lead.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:28 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Health Insurers Move Ahead, With Or Without Individual Mandate

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

For the health policy world, the Supreme Court's tough questioning of the individual mandate last week was a seismic event.

But in Hartford, Conn., the city sometimes called the epicenter of the insurance industry, David Cordani isn't quaking.

Cordani is the CEO of Cigna, the nation's fourth-largest health insurer. He says the insurance industry started changing itself before the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010. And the changes will continue regardless of what happens at the high court.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:08 am
Mon April 2, 2012

To Map Or Not To Map The Brain? That's Tonight's Question

Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman Portraits of the Mind

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:35 pm

"Mind is such an odd predicament for matter to get into," says the poet Diane Ackerman. "If a mind is just a few pounds of blood, dream and electric, how does it manage to contemplate itself? Worry about its soul? Do time and motion studies? Admire the shy hooves of a goat? Know that it will die?

...How can a neuron feel compassion?"

Yes, how?

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Arts & Life
11:05 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Fashion's New 'It' Girl ... And Boy: Andrej Pejic

During a recent photo shoot, Andrej Pejic poses on a rooftop in New York City. The 20-year-old has modeled both menswear and women's wear for some of the world's top designers.
Richard Drew AP

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Mon April 2, 2012

'Kony 2012' Sequel Due Tuesday

Facebook.com/invisiblechildren

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:01 am

The activist group behind the "Kony 2012" movement and Web video that went viral in March says it will release "Kony 2012, Part II" on Tuesday.

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Pop Culture
10:53 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Aziz Ansari's Latest Is 'Dangerously Delicious'

Aziz Ansari dissects a variety of topics in his latest comedy special, Dangerously Delicious.
Courtesy of Aziz Ansari

Aziz Ansari is about to hit the road. The 29-year-old comedian and star of Parks and Recreation is embarking on a multicity comedy tour, where he'll be riffing on what he calls the "fears of adulthood."

You know, babies. Marriage. That kind of stuff.

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Technology
10:47 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Fixing The Cutting-Edge: Innovation Meets Table Saw

David Butler and one of his safer tools.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 11:14 am

When you think of cutting-edge technology, power tools don't generally come to mind. Take the table saw: Many woodworkers are using 30-year-old saws in their wood shops and, among the major tool companies, there hasn't been much innovation since those decades-old tools came out.

But more and more inventors are trying to make these saws safer — and David Butler is one of them. At his home in Cape Cod, Mass., Butler flips on the fluorescent lights in his basement turned wood shop.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Construction Spending Dips, But Manufacturing Expands

There was a 1.1 percent decline in spending on construction in February vs. January, the Census Bureau just reported. But spending was still 5.8 percent above the level of February 2011.

According to the bureau, spending on home construction was unchanged in February from the month before. Public construction spending was down 1.7 percent.

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Irish Protest Against Household Tax As Austerity Pain Bites Further

Phyllis O'Toole joined an estimated 5,000 demonstrators in the streets of Dublin on Saturday (March 31, 2012).
Shawn Pogatchnik AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 10:55 am

House prices have crashed. Banks and businesses have failed. Jobs have been axed. People are struggling to make the mortgage.

The Republic of Ireland's 4.6 million people have suffered considerably since the financial crisis began four years ago, forcing their government to turn to the European Union and International Monetary Fund for a $90 billion bail-out.

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Movie Interviews
9:00 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Doris Day: A Hollywood Legend Reflects On Life

Doris Day's hits include "Sentimental Journey," "Till The End of Time" and "I Got the Sun in the Mornin'."
Sony Picture Archives

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:54 pm

The biggest female box-office star in Hollywood history, Doris Day started singing and dancing when she was a teenager, and made her first film when she was 24. After nearly 40 movies, she walked away from that part of her life in 1968, and started rescuing and caring for animals.

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Shots - Health Blog
8:49 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Caffeine Might Keep Moms Awake, But Not Their Babies

Moms, it's not the coffee that's keeping baby awake.
Sean Locke iStockphoto.com

Mothers of new babies might be forgiven for turning to caffeine to get through those sleep-deprived months. And they might worry that drinking coffee interferes with the sleep of breast-fed babies — the Web is full of such questions. But a new study says it's not so.

Instead, researchers in Brazil found that the babies of heavy coffee drinkers were no more likely to wake up than were babies whose moms didn't have a serious espresso habit.

Crying and colic at 3 months old, as well as frequent night waking at 12 months, were not affected by a mom's caffeine intake.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Bin Laden's Wives, Daughters Sentenced To 45 Days Detention, Deportation

Pakistani security personnel stand guard outside the house in Islamabad where family members of al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden are being held.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 9:21 am

"A Pakistani court on Monday convicted Osama bin Laden's three widows and two of his grown-up daughters of illegal residency, sentencing them to 45 days detention and ordering their deportation," Pakistan's Dawn newspaper reports.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Mega Millions Mystery: Who Won?

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

The wait continues to see who bought the three winning tickets in Friday's record $656 million Mega Millions lottery drawing.

If for some reason you haven't checked yet (yeah, right!) the winning numbers were 2, 4, 23, 38, 46 and the mega ball was 23.

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Around the Nation
7:49 am
Mon April 2, 2012

The 1940 Census: 72-Year-Old Secrets Revealed

An enumerator interviews a woman for the 1940 census. Veiled in secrecy for 72 years because of privacy protections, the 1940 U.S. census is the first historical federal decennial survey to be made available on the Internet initially rather than on microfilm.
National Archives at College Park

Nylon stockings became all the rage. Black fedoras were the "pure quill" — meaning the real deal. Bing Crosby crooned Only Forever on the console. And Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American actor ever to take home an Oscar.

Ah, 1940. Three score and 12 years ago, America was in a very different place — economically and culturally.

But on April 2, 2012, when the National Archives releases detailed data from the 1940 census, we will get an even keener idea of how much — or how little — this nation has really changed in the past 72 years.

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Europe
7:28 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Whiskey Label Honors Queen Elizabeth

Queen Elizabeth is marking 60 years on the throne, and Johnny Walker wanted to do something special. The whiskey label released a new blend called Diamond Jubilee. It's been distilling since 1952, and a bottle costs $200,000.

The Two-Way
7:25 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Trayvon Martin Case: Voice Calling For Help Isn't Zimmerman's, Experts Say

At a rally in Miami on Sunday, Arleen Poitier held a sign with images of Trayvon Martin.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 7:28 am

Over the weekend, The Orlando Sentinel reported that two experts it consulted believe the voice heard calling for help in the background during a 911 call to police is not that of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who says he acted in self defense when he shot and killed Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.

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Around the Nation
7:23 am
Mon April 2, 2012

At 92, Cab Driver Still Navigates Manhattan

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Three Books...
7:00 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Secret Worlds: 3 Magical Myths For Grown-Ups

iStockphoto.com

We have all felt the ethereal siren song of other universes — the thrilling suspicion that touching a certain ring may in fact suck you into a Wood Between the Worlds, or that if you walk just so between platforms nine and 10 at King's Cross Station, you might find yourself departing from platform nine and three-quarters. For some, the tingling sensation of magical lands fades after leaving childhood behind. But I still peer curiously into wardrobes, and thus here are three blazingly intelligent adult novels for the untamable Alice in all of us.

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Mitt Romney
4:04 am
Mon April 2, 2012

On Energy Policy, Romney's Emphasis Has Shifted

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigns in Muskego, Wis., on Saturday.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:24 am

The GOP candidates for president have seized on high gas prices as a line of attack against President Obama, largely saying the answer is more domestic oil drilling.

But GOP front-runner Mitt Romney used to have a position seemingly at odds — at least in emphasis — with what he and the other Republicans are now advocating.

As Massachusetts governor, Romney said high gasoline prices "are probably here to stay," and he advocated policies to cut energy demand.

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Business
4:03 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Oil Scare Turns FedEx Onto Energy Efficiency

A FedEx hybrid delivery truck. In FedEx's fleet of over 90,000 vehicles, 408 are hybrid or electric, and 4,000 are fuel-efficient, lower-emitting "Sprinter" vans.
Courtesy of FedEx Corp.

The rising cost of oil isn't just a hit to the family budget. Businesses are hurt, too. Few are more affected than firms like FedEx. It deploys nearly 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks and vans every day to deliver packages around the world. And few business leaders are more focused on finding alternatives to petroleum-based fuels than FedEx CEO Fred Smith.

Shortly after Smith founded Federal Express, the 1973 Arab oil embargo almost killed it. The experience imprinted Smith with a keen interest in the price and availability of oil.

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All Tech Considered
4:02 am
Mon April 2, 2012

You Should Keep Tax Records — But How, And For How Long?

A pile of IRS Form 1040 tax documents is seen in this file photo. Personal finance experts recommend keeping most records for three years after they're used in a tax return.
Tim Boyle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 10:01 am

Tax Day 2012 is looming — and after we file our returns, many of us will try to figure out what to do with the seemingly innocuous but possibly crucial documents we use to prepare our returns. Filing electronically can make those records easier to manage. But what should we really keep, and for how long?

Most experts recommend holding on to financial records for three years after they're used in a tax return — that's the amount of time the IRS has to audit taxpayers.

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The Salt
4:00 am
Mon April 2, 2012

What's Inside The 26-Ingredient School Lunch Burger?

Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:23 pm

Thiamine mononitrate, disodium inosinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride.

Why are these hard-to-pronounce ingredients added to everything from a burger served in schools to veggie burgers in the frozen food aisle of the grocery store? We try to answer that on this edition of Tiny Desk Kitchen.

It turns out the answers are as varied as the ingredients. But as we yearn to know what's in our food and how it's made, these kinds of ingredients with unfamiliar names make people suspicious.

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Latin America
3:45 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Some Argentines Demand Return Of Falkland Islands

People walk past a Falklands War memorial in Ushuaia, Argentina, on Sunday. Some Argentines want Britain to give up the Falkland Islands, which Argentina tried to take over in a bloody war in 1982.
Natacha Pisarenko AP

Thirty years ago, on April 2, 1982, Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, leading to a short but bloody war with Britain. Argentina lost, and the islands in the frigid South Atlantic stayed under British control.

Argentina still claims the islands, however, and is pressuring Britain like never before.

On a recent day, the ornate Palais de Glace museum in Argentina's capital, Buenos Aires, was packed with visitors browsing through a collection of photographs from the Falkland Islands war.

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The Two-Way
3:44 am
Mon April 2, 2012

The Historic Texas Drought, Visualized

Click here to explore the StateImpact interactive." href="/post/historic-texas-drought-visualized" class="noexit lightbox">
Click here to explore the StateImpact interactive.
NPR

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 1:00 pm

A devastating drought consumed nearly all of Texas in 2011, killing livestock, destroying agriculture and sparking fires that burned thousands of homes. It was the worst single-year drought in the state's recorded history.

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Africa
3:27 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Unease Grows Over Islamist Political Agenda In Egypt

Egyptians protest outside the administrative court in the capital, Cairo, on Tuesday. The protesters are calling for the panel drafting the constitution to be made up entirely of non-parliamentarians. Controversy swirls around the 100-member panel — handpicked by Islamist lawmakers — which includes only a handful of women and Christians.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

The Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamist groups in Egypt are flexing their growing political muscle. They control the legislative agenda in parliament, and in recent weeks introduced controversial proposals to curb social freedoms and legal rights.

Islamist lawmakers also handpicked a 100-member panel that began meeting this week to write a new constitution, which is widely expected to enshrine Islamic law.

Even so, Islamist leaders say they want Egypt to remain a secular state. But many secular Egyptians are not convinced.

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The Two-Way
12:01 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Top Prosecutor At Guantanamo Military Commissions To Retire

Brig. Gen. Mark S. Martins.
U.S. Central Command

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:03 am

NPR has learned that the top prosecutor at the Guantanamo Bay military commissions has asked to retire from the military after he finishes his assignment there.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins says he hopes the decision will drain some of the politics out of the chief prosecutor's position and will provide some continuity.

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Around the Nation
4:36 pm
Sun April 1, 2012

Fla. Cases Test 'Stand Your Ground' Law's Limits

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 10:25 pm

Since the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin made Florida's Stand Your Ground law the subject of national debate, one of the legislators who helped write it, Rep. Dennis Baxley, has been adamant in his belief that the law simply doesn't apply in this case.

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Arts & Life
4:15 pm
Sun April 1, 2012

'Did Jesus Exist?' A Historian Makes His Case

So, did Jesus really exist? With his new book, Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth, Bart Ehrman, historian and professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, wanted to provide solid historical evidence for the existence of Jesus.

"I wanted to approach this question as an historian to see whether that's right or not," Ehrman tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Strange News
3:38 pm
Sun April 1, 2012

N.Y. Preschool Starts DNA Testing For Admission

At the Porsafillo Preschool Academy, there are 32 spots but more than 12,000 applications.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:46 am

For years, New York parents have been applying to preschools even before their youngsters are born. That's not new, but the approach one prestigious pre-school on the Upper West Side is.

At the Porsafillo Preschool Academy, all applicants must now submit a DNA analysis of their children.

The preschool is housed in a modern glass and steel building designed by IM Pei. It's situated in a leafy corner of the Upper West Side. On a recent afternoon, Headmaster Rebecca Unsinn showed off "Porsafillo Pre," as it's called.

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