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Shots - Health News
11:19 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Meet The Bacteria That Make A Stink In Your Pits

While you're resting, your armpit bacteria are hard at work pumping out stinky thioalcohols.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 6:33 pm

The human armpit has a lot to offer bacteria. It's moist, it's warm, and it's usually dark.

But when the bacteria show up, they can make a stink. That's because when some kinds of bacteria encounter sweat they produce smelly compounds, transforming the armpit from a neutral oasis to the mothership of body odor. And one group of bacteria is to blame for the stink, researchers say.

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Code Switch
10:33 am
Tue March 31, 2015

The Fear Of Black Men In America: Join Our Twitter Chat #FearAndRace

Chat with us on twitter today at 12:30 p.m. ET using the hashtag #FearAndRace.
Andreas Eldh Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 5:56 pm

NPR's Michel Martin led two challenging conversations about race this week, focusing on fearful perceptions of African-American men and how these fears play out in people's everyday lives. Guests including author and Georgetown University Law professor Paul Butler examined the research and the complicated emotions behind this fear.

"When you're in an elevator or walking behind somebody and you feel like you have to perform to make them feel safe, it's like apologizing for your existence," Butler says.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Tue March 31, 2015

From 'Dragon Tattoo' To The 'Spider's Web': Stieg Larsson's Heroine Returns

Noomi Rapace stars as heroine Lisbeth Salander in the Swedish film adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
Nordisk Film The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 3:23 pm

Just about a full decade since the girl with a dragon tattoo was introduced to readers, she'll be making her grand return to fiction — albeit with another author's name on the cover. Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy of crime novels is set to become something more on Sept. 1, when the series' new addition hits store shelves as The Girl in the Spider's Web. Publisher Alfred A. Knopf released the book's title and cover art Tuesday.

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Goats and Soda
9:16 am
Tue March 31, 2015

The Challenge: Curb Violence In Most Violent City. Hint: Nuns Can Help

A police officer is silhouetted through the emergency room door at a public hospital in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. With 91 murders per 100,000 people, the Central American nation is often called the most violent in the world. The homicide rate is roughly 20 times that of the U.S. rate, according to a 2011 U.N. report.
Esteban Felix AP

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 2:50 pm

The most pressing health threat in the Latin American country of Honduras has nothing to do with germs or superbugs.

It's from the barrel of a gun.

Every day, patients with gunshot wounds seek treatment, overwhelming the country's few hospitals. Violence is the third leading cause of death in the country of 8.2 million people. For four years running now, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime has ranked San Pedro Sula, the second-largest city in Honduras, as the world's most violent city.

So how do you stop it?

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Iran Nuclear Talks Deadline Will Be Extended By A Day, U.S. Says

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 8:13 pm

This post was last updated at 7:54 p.m. ET

The U.S. says enough progress has been made in talks with Iran on its nuclear program to warrant an extension of Tuesday's 6 p.m. ET deadline by a day.

"We've made enough progress in the last days to merit staying until Wednesday," spokeswoman Marie Harf said in a statement. "There are several difficult issues still remaining."

She said Secretary of State John Kerry, who was scheduled to leave the talks Tuesday, will remain until Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Indiana Governor Stands By 'Religious Freedom' Law But Promises Fix

Demonstrators gather outside the City County Building in Indianapolis on Monday, calling for the state House to roll back the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which critics say can be used to discriminate against gays and lesbians.
Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 1:21 pm

A new Indiana law that has set off a firestorm of criticism and threats of boycotts should be repealed or revised, says Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, whose city is hosting the NCAA men's basketball tournament's Final Four this weekend.

Around midday Tuesday, Gov. Mike Pence said the controversial legislation will be clarified instead of being annulled. He added, "We'll fix this and we'll move forward."

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Live From Small Town America: Teachers Who Blog To Stay In Touch

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 1:53 pm

Katie Morrow became a teacher, among other things, because of wanderlust.

"I'm going to be a teacher because I can go anywhere in the world," she thought.

She's originally from a small town in Nebraska called O'Neill, population 3,700. "In the middle of nowhere, literally," she says.

So where did she end up teaching? Right back in O'Neill. She fell in love with a hometown boy and ended up at O'Neill's only public school. It's K-12, with 750 students.

Morrow teaches middle-school English; she's also a technology integration specialist.

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Around the Nation
7:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Selfie Sticks Get The Boot At Coachella And Lallapalooza

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
7:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Colorado Allows Sales Of Powdered Alcohol

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Business
5:03 am
Tue March 31, 2015

With 'Single-Stream' Recycling, Convenience Comes At A Cost

At Resource Management's materials recovery facility, workers pull plastic bags, other trash and large pieces of cardboard off the conveyor belts before the mixed single-stream recyclables enter the sorting machines.
Véronique LaCapra St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 1:23 pm

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Afghanistan
5:00 am
Tue March 31, 2015

The Ascent Of Afghan Women

Sandra Calligaro for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 4:47 pm

Zahra Karimi Nooristani, 18, cautiously works her way down a rock face high above Kabul as her coach, Farhad Jamshid, guides her.

It is hazardous for his top female student to be rappelling here, not only because of the steep drop, but because she is using a frayed, 9-year-old rope handed down from the men's mountaineering team.

Another danger she faces is the prospect of her neighbors finding out she's climbing at all.

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National Security
4:59 am
Tue March 31, 2015

After Snowden, The NSA Faces Recruitment Challenge

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 10:16 am

Daniel Swann is exactly the type of person the National Security Agency would love to have working for it. The 22-year-old is a fourth-year concurrent bachelor's-master's student at Johns Hopkins University with a bright future in cybersecurity.

And growing up in Annapolis, Md., not far from the NSA's headquarters, Swann thought he might work at the agency, which intercepts phone calls, emails and other so-called "signals intelligence" from U.S. adversaries.

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Television
4:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Trevor Noah To Replace Jon Stewart As Host Of 'The Daily Show'

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mark this next story as a sign of a changing nation. Comedy Central has announced the successor to Jon Stewart. Trevor Noah takes over "The Daily Show," the fake news program that's often as influential as real news shows.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Negotiations Over Iran's Nuclear Program Come Down To The Wire

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 9:49 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Indiana GOP To Revisit Controversial Religious Freedom Act

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations. To see more, visit http://ipbs.org/.

NPR Story
4:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Indianapolis Mayor Calls On Legislature To Repeal Or Ammend Bill

Demonstrators gather outside the City County Building in Indianapolis Monday, calling for the state house to roll back the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which critics say can be used to discriminate against gays and lesbians.
Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That Republican mayor of Indianapolis is Greg Ballard, and he's on the line now. Mayor Ballard, welcome to the program.

MAYOR GREG BALLARD: Good morning. Thank you for having me.

INSKEEP: So what's wrong with this law?

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Shots - Health News
4:58 am
Tue March 31, 2015

No Easy, Reliable Way To Screen For Suicide

About twice a year, statistics suggest, a pilot somewhere in the world — usually flying alone — deliberately crashes a plane. The Germanwing flight downed last week may be one such case. But most people who fit the psychological profile of the pilots in these very rare events never have problems while flying.
Patrik Stollarz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 5:31 pm

Even a careful psychiatric examination of the co-pilot involved in last week's Germanwings jetliner crash probably would not have revealed whether he intended to kill himself, researchers say.

"As a field, we're not very good at accurately predicting who is at risk for suicidal behavior," says Matthew Nock, a psychology professor at Harvard. He says studies show that mental health professionals "perform no better than chance" when it comes to predicting which patients will attempt suicide.

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The Two-Way
7:23 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Pharmacists Group Votes To Discourage Members From Providing Execution Drugs

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 8:16 pm

The largest pharmacist association in the country has voted to discourage its members from participating in executions.

The move could make executions harder for states that have been ordering their drugs from compounding pharmacies. As we've reported, some states like Texas turned to the pharmacies after big pharmaceutical companies — under pressure from death penalty opponents — decided to stop selling their drugs to U.S. prisons.

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Race
6:23 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Fear Of The Black Man: How Racial Bias Could Affect Crime, Labor Rates

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with professors Phillip Atiba Goff of UCLA and Harry Holzer of Georgetown University about how fears of African-American men are manifested in the criminal justice system and the labor market, and what that means for the broader African-American community.

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All Tech Considered
6:23 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Bringing Internet To The Far Corners Of The Earth

Google is doing test flights of its balloons carrying Internet routers around the world. Last June, a balloon was released at the airport in Teresina, Brazil.
Google

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 10:22 pm

About 2 billion people on earth have a smartphone with a decent Internet connection, but 5 billion are largely or entirely offline, according to global figures by the ITU.

That gap is (surprise, surprise) a big opportunity for Silicon Valley. Google and Facebook are already on high-profile campaigns to connect the unconnected. And they're betting they can make billions of dollars getting people without electricity or toilets to pay for the Internet.

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U.S.
6:23 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Mass Tax Foreclosure Threatens Detroit Homeowners

Homeowners sit in a conference room in Detroit's Cobo Center while waiting for their cases to be heard to avoid foreclosure from tax debts in Detroit on Jan. 29. This year, Wayne County officials sent out 62,000 foreclosure notices to city homeowners behind on property taxes.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 8:15 pm

In Detroit, tens of thousands of people are facing a deadline Tuesday that could cost some of them their homes. That's when homeowners have to make arrangements to either pay delinquent property taxes — or risk losing their home at a county auction.

When Detroit emerged from bankruptcy last year, it did so with a razor-thin financial cushion. It desperately needs every bit of tax revenue it can muster.

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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

California's Death Row, The Nation's Largest, Runs Out Of Room

The country's largest death row has run out of room.

As NPR member station KCRW reports, that's because a legal fight has meant that the state has not put an inmate to death in nearly a decade, leaving more than 750 of them on death row in the state.

KCRW reports:

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World
5:32 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Bangladeshi Blogger, Known As Free-Thinker, Violently Killed In Dhaka

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Airstrikes In Yemen Intensify, Hit Refugee Camp

Pakistani activists march in support of the Saudi government at a protest in Quetta on March 30, 2015. Pakistan is the latest country to join a Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen.
BANARAS KHAN AFP/Getty Images

Saudi-led airstrikes intensified against Houthi rebels in Yemen. International aid agencies say one strike hit a camp for displaced people and refugees in the north of the country, killing at least 29 people and wounding many others.

Doctors Without Borders (MSF) says the strike hit the Al Mazraq refugee camp in an area controlled by the Houthis. The aid agency says at least 34 people were taken to a nearby hospital, and an additional 29 people were dead on arrival.

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Law
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Prosecution Rests Case Against Admitted Boston Marathon Bomber

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Music
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Review: Courtney Barnett, 'Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit'

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:51 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Why Are Chinese Artists Representing Kenya At The Venice Biennale?

In The Shame In Venice 2, Kenyan artist Michael Soi protests the makeup of his country's pavilion at the Biennale.
Courtesy of Michael Soi

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 8:15 am

There's something sketchy at this year's Venice Biennale — the international art exhibition sometimes dubbed the Olympics of the contemporary art world.

When you come to the Kenyan pavilion, almost all of the artists will be ... Chinese.

The Biennale, one of the oldest and most important exhibitions of contemporary art in the world, takes place in Venice every two years. Thirty countries, including the U.S., have a permanent slot.

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Author Interviews
4:16 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

How 'One Nation' Didn't Become 'Under God' Until The '50s Religious Revival

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:27 pm

The words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance and the phrase "In God we trust" on the back of a dollar bill haven't been there as long as most Americans might think. Those references were inserted in the 1950s during the Eisenhower administration, the same decade that the National Prayer Breakfast was launched, according to writer Kevin Kruse. His new book is One Nation Under God.

In the original Pledge of Allegiance, Francis Bellamy made no mention of God, Kruse says. Bellamy was Christian socialist, a Baptist who believed in the separation of church and state.

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Parallels
3:59 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Cholita, An Abused Bear In Peru, Gets A New Home In Colorado

Cholita, an Andean bear, was abused in a circus in Peru and is now in a small zoo. An animal welfare group has now received permission to take Cholita to a wildlife sanctuary in Colorado, along with more than 30 former circus lions.
Courtesy of Animal Defenders International

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 8:48 pm

A badly abused Peruvian bear named Cholita is coming to a sanctuary in Colorado. Animal Defenders International announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expedited the request and she will be on her way next month.

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It's All Politics
3:44 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Money Rules: Candidates Go Around The Law, As Cash Records To Be Smashed

Would-be presidential candidates are ditching "testing the waters" and "exploratory committees" to hold onto unlimited and undisclosed cash for longer.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 9:00 pm

This is Part One in an occasional series of features on campaign finance, called "Money Rules."

The hunt for big bucks is changing the way politicians run for president.

When a candidate finally admits he or she is a candidate, donors are limited to gifts of $2,700. (A donor can give an additional $2,700 if the candidate makes it through to the general election.)

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